Category: Tiny House Safety

Tiny Home Safety: Top 26 Life-Saving Tips From the Experts

Tiny Home Safety: Top 26 Life-Saving Tips From the Experts

Tiny home safety is one of the most crucial concerns of new homeowners. 

How can one stay safe and secure in such a small abode? 

Tiny houses are not entirely dangerous. However, you should never be complacent—authorities have been strict with tiny houses for valid reasons

Moreover, the critics’ disapproval of tiny houses is not baseless. After all, they are only advocating for the highest safety standards for properties.  

Therefore, if you’re really hell-bent on living in a smaller home, then tiny home safety should be your utmost priority at all times. 

In this blog post, we shared 26 tested and proven safety tips from experts. 

Tiny home safety: Inside your home

Whether you live alone, with an elderly, or with your kids in your tiny home, you should take notes from these tiny home safety tips. Don’t worry, we have something for everybody. 

Bathroom 

tiny bathroom with cleaning materials
Add more traction to your teeny bathroom’s tile floors to prevent slips and falls.

Did you know that the majority of accidents and injuries happened to people who were in their bathrooms? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 14 percent of those people get hospitalized. 

With a bathroom that’s even teenier, how does tiny home safety work? Similar to regular houses, you need to do some few tricks to keep you safe while showering, soaking, etc. 

1. Install grab bars. 

Falling is one of the top five causes of unintentional home injuries. Every year, slippery bathroom floors cause 80% of falls in the elderly aged 65 years and older. So, it’s no surprise that bathrooms are more sinister than you think.  

Therefore, whether you live with an elderly relative or not, you have to add grab bars to ensure tiny home safety. Besides being secure fixtures against falls and slips, these metal bars can serve as towel racks near your bathtub or your shower area. 

2. Don’t just dump anything in a composting toilet. 

Composting toilets’ prices and installation processes can be expensive. But besides their price, take good care of composting toilets because they’re the most convenient type of toilets for tiny houses on wheels. You don’t even need to frequent dumping places to release their waste. 

Prolong your composting toilet’s life by not throwing anything in there, except your waste and absorbent materials like untreated sawdust. Absorbent materials will create an odor barrier, minimizing the bad smell. Avoid throwing trash like baby diapers and tissue paper as well. 

3. Add anti-slip accessories.

Metal grab bars, although effective for tiny home safety, are not enough to prevent slips. You have to make sure your floor and walls are not that slippery when wet. Good thing you rely on affordable but effective anti-slip accessories for bathrooms such as stickers, mats, and tapes. 

If you’re still in the process of building your tiny house, you can even install anti-slip, textured tiles. Meanwhile, if you already have tiles, you can apply an anti-slip treatment, which is a solution that adds traction to smooth and shiny tiles. One example is Stone Grip. 

4. Add tamper-resistant outlets. 

Tamper-resistant outlets are great tiny home safety accessories, especially if you live with kids or pets. Also known as tamper-resistant receptacles (TRR), these outlets have safety shutters that block the access of any foreign object into the receptacle. 

With the safety shutters inside, it will only work if you insert a fully functional plug. You can’t insert broken plugs with jagged edges—otherwise, the safety shutters inside won’t open and you can’t use the outlet. We suggest you add these outlets everywhere in your house, especially in the bathroom. 

5. Install night lights. 

Night lights will increase tiny home safety and cultivate your kids’ independence. These are small lighting fixtures that don’t produce an overwhelming brightness, but are still effective in lighting a dark room. 

If your kids are scared of going to the bathroom at night, you can teach them to turn on the night lights. Plus, they don’t consume that much power, so you don’t have to worry about unnecessary energy loss at night. 

Kitchen 

tiny home safety - tiny kitchen that is white and clean
It’s better to have the expensive essentials in your kitchen than having multiple pieces of mediocre equipment.

The kitchen is where you prepare your kid’s meals, boil water for your coffee, and wash your dishes, mugs, and plates. That only means you should be steadfast in ensuring this area is contamination-free and accident-proof. 

Bathrooms can be dangerous, but your kitchen can be lethal, too. Take note of these tiny home safety tips in the kitchen. 

1. Use a cast-iron skillet. 

Not only this is life-saving (you can fight zombies with this!), but also space-saving. Cast-iron skillets may be a bit expensive, but they have many qualities that compensate for the price. Cast-iron skillets have excellent non-stick surface, chemical-free material, and great heat-retaining quality. 

Best of all, they are space-saving because they’re versatile—you can cook them on open-fire or on a gas stove. So, if the situation calls for it—like a family barbecue or camping with your buddies, you can rely on cast-iron skillets. You don’t need to bring another type of cooking pan to the trip.

2. Stock on hooks. 

In this blog post, we explained why hooks should be staples in every tiny house. However, hooks should be the most present in your tiny house kitchen. Besides being affordable and durable enough to carry heavy objects, they are also highly versatile, which is ideal for a small kitchen. 

You can use hooks to hang caddies for spices and herbs, baking tools, glasses, plates, and mugs. You can mount a single hook to hang a drying towel or use several to dry pots and pans. Need something customizable? Use two durable hooks to put up a pegboard, which you can use for multiple things. 

3. Prevent gas buildup in your propane stoves.

You can use propane stoves to cook meals inside your tiny house; but make sure to prevent gas buildup. To avoid that, make sure your kitchen is well-ventilated, so the toxic fumes to exit your kitchen area. Moreover, when you’re cooking, open your windows or turn on an exhaust fan. Propane stoves generate a lot of heat. 

Moreover, don’t forget to turn off your propane stove when not in use. You will also need a carbon monoxide detector in case the gas leaks. Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless, so you will need a detector to prevent contamination during a leakage. 

4. Avoid/eliminate electric stove hazards.

Electric stoves are safer than propane stoves, but they still have fire hazards. Therefore, you need to eliminate those and follow safety measures. First of all, be mindful if they’re turned on or not. Propane stoves are easier to detect when they’re running since they smell. Electric stoves, on the other hand, are silent and odorless. 

Another hazard to eliminate is excessive heat generation. Again, it’s not easy to notice right away that an electric stove is turned on. When an electric stove gets too hot, you might accidentally burn your hand if you’re not alert enough to notice that it’s turned on. So, if not necessary, don’t use too much heat.  

5. Keep a fire extinguisher nearby. 

And learn how to use it! Knowing how to prevent fires in the kitchen is not enough. You also need to know how to put them out. Since you live in a tiny house, you should keep one under your kitchen sink—before a fire from your burning mac and cheese engulfs your home. 

You can buy fire extinguishers best used for houses. Since we’re talking about kitchen fires here, a standard fire extinguisher can already help you. It can put out Class A, B, and C fires, which are ordinary combustibles, flammable liquids and gases, and electrical equipment fires.

Bedroom 

tiny home safety - bedroom, POV from inside the closer
Get a peaceful sleep by making sure your sheets are clean and your furniture pieces are untippable.

Your bedroom is the space where you rest, dream, and recover. Nothing should go wrong, right? Well, don’t be too relaxed. You still have outlets, wirings, and windows here, right? Therefore, to truly achieve peace of mind, you should also ensure it’s a secure environment. Follow these tiny home safety tips for your bedroom. 

1. Prevent bed bug-friendly moisture. 

Bed bugs love humid environments. If your bedroom doesn’t have a good indoor airflow, they will grow in no time and might trigger adult on-set allergic reactions. Bed bugs might even cause skin irritation, asthma attacks, and anaphylaxis shocks. 

Therefore, do your best to prevent bed bug infestation. Air out your mattress frequently. If you can, wash them every week. Choose a high-quality material, too, if you haven’t bought one yet. Most importantly, don’t forget to open your windows every day at certain periods to let the stale air out. 

2. Use dust-proof pillow and mattress covers. 

Dust mites also thrive in cramped, humid places, so it’s very likely that you will have them in your bedroom if the air doesn’t circulate properly. Also, did you know they love your skin flakes? Yikes. 

To prevent dust mites from growing in your bedroom, use dust-proof pillow and mattress covers. If you can, avoid putting carpets in your room. Use sheets and rugs with fine threads. You also have to dry your newly washed pillows and mattresses in a hot dryer. 

3. Attach your drawers and storage boxes to the wall. 

Even if your tiny house is on a foundation, you still have to make sure those heavy boxes will not tip. You’ll never know when earthquakes will strike. Those sharp edges must also be covered and those drawers should be locked, especially if you live with a child who’s in his/her “terrible-twos” stage.

Besides securing your shelves, drawers, organizers, and boxes to the wall, we also don’t suggest putting freestanding items in your bedroom. Apart from occupying your precious floor space, they will also just contribute to the dust-gathering convention in your bedroom. 

Tiny home safety: Outside and beyond

Travelling/On-road safety

tiny home safety - tiny house on wheels with a lush green background
Before you live that mobile life, make sure your towing vehicle is capable to tow the heavy load behind it.

Do you have a movable tiny house? Tiny houses on wheels are known to be trickier to handle since you have many things to consider such as the weight distribution, load limit, and other road hazards. Plus, you’ll be traveling most of the time, so you will do more upkeep frequently. 

With that said, get a load of these tiny home safety steps for when you’re travelling. 

1. Follow the required service schedule. 

Your towing vehicle has a service schedule, which is indicated on the car’s dashboard’s warning light or its manufacturer’s manual. Now, you should follow this schedule to prevent fluid leaks, on-the-road malfunctions, and engine trouble. Plus you will save yourself from expensive repairs and replacements in the future. 

Moreover, by taking care of your towing vehicle, you can preserve its resale value. Many homeowners and critics don’t like tiny houses because they lose resale value quickly. If you keep the car in good condition, then your mobile house’s value won’t dwindle that much. 

2. Ensure there’s proper weight distribution. 

Tiny houses on wheels (THOWs) have the same materials as normal houses, so they are a bit heavier than most RVs and trailers. Therefore, you should be meticulous with keeping stuff inside to avoid surpassing the weight limit and improper weight distribution.

Many states in the U.S. also impose a weight limit on tiny houses on the road, which you should adhere to. Meanwhile, for a smooth-sailing towing, your tiny house should have a proper weight distribution. 

The standard ratio is that from the trailer tongue to the center point of the axle, it should weigh 60% of the total weight. The remaining area from that center point to the rear area of the THOW should weigh 40% of the total weight. 

3. Make sure your vehicle has a great towing capacity. 

There are heavy-duty SUVs but there are also large vehicles exclusively designed for towing. Therefore, choose the latter but with even greater towing capacities. Remember, your tiny house’s weight will increase as you put more stuff in it. 

The brands of the best towing trucks for tiny houses are Ford, Chevrolet, Nissan, and Ram. These big boys can pull more than 30,000 pounds. The Ram 3500, particularly, has a towing limit of 31,210. That’s monstrous even for tiny houses.  

Storms, hurricanes, etc. 

tiny home safety - a dark cloud looms over a tiny house
Will your tiny house withstand a storm?

There are dozens of reasons why some states in the U.S. impose strict standards on tiny houses, two of them being storms and hurricanes. 

They can mess up even the bigger houses—can a tiny house withstand them? Yes, they can. Just follow these tips for securing your tiny home against extreme weather and reducing the damage it causes.  

1. Elevate your tiny house.

The simplest and most affordable countermeasure to avoid flood damage is to move your tiny house to higher ground. If this isn’t an option because your house is stationary, then you can do a preventative measure like elevating the whole structure. 

Meanwhile, do your part and get insurance for your house. Before, it was challenging to insure tiny houses, but it’s definitely better now. Insuring tiny houses can cost $500 to $600 per year. 

2. Toughen your roof against strong winds. 

The roof, doors, and windows are the parts that usually get damaged over time. So, you need to make them “tougher” against the strong winds, which are especially brought by hurricanes. 

For example, the Journal of Light Construction suggests you tighten your roof by applying a high-wind-rated roof covering, re-nailing the roof sheathings, or using wind-rated asphalt shingles. 

3. Weatherstrip and caulk your windows, doors, and walls.

As for moisture, leaking, or rust, get ahead of those by weatherstripping your windows and doors and caulking your house. Weatherstripping is done by applying a seal that endures friction and external elements, prolonging the life of the fixture.

The Dept. of Energy particularly suggests vinyl and metal weatherstripping since they are durable and they last years. Vinyl is typically used for weatherstripping garage doors, but it can be a bit pricey. 

4. Secure your appliances. 

You secured your roofing and your fixtures—how about your appliances and wiring? Just because you’re off-grid doesn’t mean they are safe. 

Therefore, make sure to ground your solar panels to avoid electrocution and fires, even though most models are waterproof. Invest in weatherproof appliances and cords. If you have solar batteries, keep them warm in snowstorms by charging them. 

5. Invest in your insulation. 

Proper insulation not only keeps you warm during the bad weather but also saves energy. Storm windows and doors, particularly, bring those benefits. They help regulate your tiny house’s temperature, preventing energy loss. 

To insulate effectively against storms, you can use fiberglass insulation. It’s an excellent and easy-to-install insulating material, plus it’s not too heavy or expensive. Other good insulation materials are cotton, spray foam, and Rockwool. 

Protection against theft

a robber pries a door open
Tiny house theft is becoming more common these days.

Tiny house theft has been rampant, so you can’t be too complacent with your mobile home. It’s small and movable—it’s no wonder it’s red-hot on the criminals’ radar. Therefore, it’s essential for you to invest in security methods and gadgets. 

1. Use wheel clamps and claws. 

Wheel clamps and claws are anti-theft wheel locks, which prevent your towing car or RV from getting stolen. 

Clamps lock the lug nuts, which secure the wheels to your car’s axles. They are pricier but more effective. Claws, on the other hand, help immobilize your wheels—having these will prevent your vehicles from rotating and turning. 

2. Purchase heavy chains. 

Heavy-duty chains will also make it nearly impossible for a robber to tow your tiny house away. These chains may have clevis grab hooks on both ends, which prevent the chains from slipping. 

Heavy-duty chains are being used to tow large vehicles with tons of cargo, so they won’t break easily. It’s better if you tie it to a permanent structure—yes, even if your tiny house is built on a foundation. 

3. Get trailer hitch locks.

Simple, cheap, and easy-to-install, a hitch lock will help foil a sneaky robbery attempt. Hitch locks fuse the cargo and the trailer’s hitch, preventing any thief from towing it. A trailer hitch lock can be made of aluminum, which is a tough kind of metal. 

If you search for hitch locks, look for ones which design suit your tiny house or RV. Great hitch locks can resist crowbars, saws, and even sledgehammers. 

4. Buy an alarm system. 

Alarm systems are not just for regular houses. There are actually plenty of fully-functional alarm systems for RVs and small homes

The prices of alarm systems for tiny houses start at $29 and can go up to $700. Some devices will set off and call the police, fire, and medical dispatches. Others will let you sync it with your phone in an app. They can even have wireless motion sensors. 

5. Conceal a tracking device in your tiny house.

Concealing a tracking device inside your tiny house will be your last line of defense. These devices are waterproof and they can recharge from your RV’s battery. They will also send a notification to your phone. 

When shopping for a tracking device, check the reviews if its motion sensors are highly sensitive. This is ideal because once the trailer moves, it should send an alarm to your mobile phone ASAP. 

Conclusion 

Your tiny house is not just your home; it’s your investment. Unfortunately, it’s small and mobile—many confident robbers will try to snatch it in a snap. 

Therefore, regardless of its value, you should do everything you can to protect it. 

Also, remember that it’s not easy to get a tiny house in most states in the U.S. If you’re lucky enough to live in one, then do your part and invest in safety measures.

Besides, you can’t trust anybody these days even if you live in a tiny house community. Better be safe than sorry! 

Can’t get enough of our safety tips? We have more here. 

Related questions

Do tiny houses get stolen? 

Yes, surprisingly, tiny houses are getting stolen these days, whether they are on wheels or on a foundation. Yes, even if the house doesn’t have wheels! The criminals are obviously not just interested in the gadgets and jewellery but the house itself, which is interesting because tiny houses lose value quickly.  

How do I keep my tiny house from being stolen? 

First, spend more time researching—read tiny home safety blog posts and watch YouTube product reviews. After that, start canvassing for heavy chains, hitch locks, and alarm systems. Research is imperative because if those devices are not effective, then your tiny house will still get stolen. You can also hide your wheels in a secure place if you’re parking it in a spot. 

How do you disconnect a trailer? 

  1. First, park it in a place with a flat surface, so the trailer won’t easily roll down. 
  2. Next, turn off the engine and then set the parking brake. 
  3. Put a wedge under the trail. 
  4. Now, disconnect the wires and unhinge the safety chains. 
  5. Loosen the coupler and the hand wheel to drop the ball clamp. 
  6. Use the tongue’s handle to lift the trailer to release the coupler from the hitch ball. 
  7. The trailer will disengage once the hitch ball is released. 

10 Surprising Reasons Why Critics Don’t Like Tiny Houses

10 Surprising Reasons Why Critics Don’t Like Tiny Houses

Many happy individuals and families have praised the tiny house movement. Still, there are many reasons why critics don’t like tiny houses.

In the U.S., tiny houses have been all the rage in recent years. People from all walks of life seem to be interested in the idea of downsizing. 

For them, their needs can fit in an area that measures less than 400 square feet. 

However, does the tiny house living really work for everyone? 

We may have a blog about tiny houses, but that doesn’t mean we won’t shed light on critics’ statements about tiny houses. 

In this article, we listed some surprising reasons why critics don’t like tiny houses. 

Why critics don’t like tiny houses

They are not always right, but critics don’t base their opinions on pointless things. Again, we are a tiny house blog—but that doesn’t mean we advocate for the movement blindly. 

The Tiny House movement has its advantages, yes—but our normal and our good is not the same for other people.   

1. The semi-false promises of cheap cost of living. 

why critics don't like tiny houses - tiny house with no roof
Does living in a tiny house like this really reduce your monthly living expenses?

When people think of tiny houses, a lower cost of living instantly comes to their mind. The thought of living with no debt, no mortgage, and cheap insurance is too sexy to pass by.  

We don’t disagree, though—living in a tiny house does allow you to pay way smaller utility bills, compared to living in a bigger house. However, what about the other expenses that will add to the monthly cost of living?  

The truth is that the cost of living in a tiny house can potentially balloon bigger because of the hidden costs. 

You may have already paid off the construction or the prefab model, but you will still spend on the following as you reside in your small abode: 

  • Home improvements and upgrades
  • Insurance plans 
  • Zoning applications and permits
  • Traveling expenses
  • Parking spots 
  • Service fees and maintenance for your SUV/truck, which tows your tiny house.
  • And many more factors, which we will expand later.

This is why tiny houses don’t get the approval of most critics. The movement itself has a semi-false promise of a cheaper cost of living when in reality, some people might have to spend a little more than a small amount. 

2. Not the most ideal space for pregnancy.

This might not sound too surprising—pregnancy, after all, is a scary and overwhelming journey. So, living in a tiny house (with wheels, lord!) might sound like stepping on your own toe with thorny soles. 

Yes, you can make many preparations and adjustments to make your SO or wife comfortable, but what if it comes as a surprise? Making those changes in your tiny home will be even harder. 

Case in point: this couple eventually abandoned their tiny house when they became pregnant. Sadly, they came to the realization that their space was too tiny for the girl’s growing belly, and their living expenses were also increasing. Worst of all, they encountered unexpected health challenges. 

Because of those and a couple of other risks, it’s unsurprising why critics don’t like tiny houses. It’s also why housing and building authorities scrutinize the safety of tiny houses on wheels. 

That is why if you’re planning to start a family, you might want to think twice before you buy that plan or build that tiny abode. 

3. Raising a kid is difficult. 

why critics don't like tiny houses - a kid sleeping on a white bed
Raising a kid on an unsuitable environment is like a walk on a park… on hell.

Yes, this is the ugly truth— just because kids are small doesn’t mean their needs are the same size, too. Raising a kid is a humongous challenge on its own already—but doing it in a tiny house would be brutal. 

In our blog post about raising a kid in a tiny house, we mentioned that parents should consider the ethics of the act itself. That’s because every child has different needs because every child is unique. As their parent, you should be able to cover their changing needs in the various stages of their life—this is the ethical thing to do. 

California Department of Education (CDE) reports that the first eighteen months after birth is a critical stage in a child’s development. They learn how to make sense of the world—and they do it in such an overwhelming sense for the parent because they will taste, climb, and grasp everything. 

As a result, it’s only imperative that a child’s environment is comfortable and safe. Being in a limited space, your challenges in securing an ideal surrounding might increase. 

Add that to your existing problems and you might fail in achieving your goal in providing a good environment for them. 

Therefore, even though living in a tiny house may help you save expenses, you should reflect more if you are emotionally, psychologically ready to raise a child. Remember: they depend on you, only you. 

4. Structural safety concerns.

Shrewd, hungry thieves can find many ways to break into a home. That means not all houses are 100% safe, including tiny houses. However, tiny houses especially become risky when storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes are thrown into the mix of living hazards. 

Safety could easily be a deal-breaker for tiny house owners, especially if they live in nearby states where hurricanes are most common. Those calamities are also why tiny houses are strictly monitored in Florida, despite the state having RV parks. In other words, it’s not a tiny house-friendly state.

Can tiny houses on foundations and on wheels withstand external elements like storms? They can. The only thing is, you have to spend time and money on ensuring they are secure. 

Not only will you have to consider the structure’s endurance during the storm, but also the debris, electrical, and water damage after all that ruckus. You also have to check if the foundation, the windows, and roof panels are still in one piece. 

Apart from those, you also have to be sure that moisture doesn’t stay for too long in your restricted living space. Otherwise, you’ll be sneezing and sniffling from mold and mildew in no time.

Considering how “easy” it is for a tiny house to be unsafe if the homeowners are lazy and neglectful, it’s no wonder why critics don’t like tiny houses. 

5. The high cost of building one.

why critics don't like tiny houses - mobile house
You will still spend money to achieve financial freedom. Ironic, isn’t it?

Now, this might surprise a lot of people, especially those who just knew about the movement: tiny houses don’t cost a tiny amount

Don’t let the idea of downsizing prevent you from considering the additional expenses you might have in this journey. 

How much can a tiny house cost?

  • Excluding the hidden costs after constructing one, building a tiny house might cost you up to $30,000 alone. 
  • The median price of buying one might also cost more than $55,000. 
  • Ryan Fitzgerald of Raleigh Realty also recommends setting aside $65,000 for building a tiny house. 
  • Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), which can be considered tiny houses, might also cost you up to $200,000. 

What elements affect those prices? Well, there’s plenty—materials, the builder, the building permit, and the location. If you buy a prefab model, you might also pay for a hefty shipping fee. 

Buying only a kit or the blueprint and then building it on your own will allow you to save a lot of labor cost, obviously. However, you are risking that peace of mind from knowing your house is built by licensed experts. 

This is why most critics refuse to acknowledge the legitimacy of tiny houses. They say that people become blinded by the inexpensive lifestyle—when in truth, they will still need to spend a considerable amount of money before tasting that financial freedom. 

6. Inevitable isolation.

You’re a human, not an island—you don’t always have to deal with things by yourself all the time. However, in living in a tiny house, you might find yourself in that situation frequently. 

It might be challenging for you to find your tribe, a.k.a. people who also live in tiny houses. Why? Well, for one, some states are just beginning to build tiny house villages and communities, which means only a few of them exist in a state. 

Another barrier is parking spots. In the U.S., it’s already hard for large vehicles like trucks to find a decent parking area. Imagine finding spots for a whole house on wheels! 

Besides that, some parking spots will also cost you $300 to $600 every month. Nevertheless, it’s still way cheaper than apartment rent, which could go as high as $1216.

The point here is you will jump through several hoops before you settle in a place where you can be around like-minded individuals. Therefore, isolation, when you’re living in a tiny house, is inevitable. 

Being human beings, we need socializing as it affects our overall health. Even the quality and the number of our social relationships are factors in the longevity of our lives. It has also been proven that socializing has a positive effect on relieving work stress

For those reasons, it’s understandable why critics don’t like tiny houses. People may benefit from the low cost of living in one, but some are not really mentally equipped to handle the drawbacks that come with it—one of them being isolation.  

7. Poor-performing resale value.

why critics don't like tiny houses - resale value of tiny houses are poor
Tiny house lose their value pretty quick.

You might want to think twice if you’re buying a tiny house as an investment. Tiny houses, especially those on wheels, don’t do well in the resale value department. 

There are many reasons for this. First of all, tiny houses don’t maintain almost all the critical factors that boost resale value.

Location, usable space, age, and condition—most tiny houses just can’t compete with regular houses when it comes to those. You have to deal with the irregularity and unavailability of tiny house communities, plus the constant maintaining and upgrading of the house.

The market of tiny house buyers is also not that big and active. Remember the legal hoops you have to jump through to own and live in a tiny house? Yes, that also discourages people from buying into this trend. 

This is why critics don’t give this movement a chance, especially those who are long-term thinkers. 

8. Sanitation issues. 

Let’s talk about what most of you are really curious about… How does sanitation work in tiny houses? Do tiny houses have toilets? Where does the waste go? The questions can go on and on. 

Critics specifically scrutinize sanitation in tiny houses. It’s understandable, though—a tiny space that’s not well-maintained will easily become a breeding ground for bacteria. 

Moreover, apparently, the waste can be an issue to the local waste and sewage authorities, since the homeowners often use composting toilets. 

It can also be challenging for plumbing professionals to install a waste system that has different specs than the average toilet, but it still has to cater to the local building code.

Tiny houses do have bathrooms with functioning toilets and showers. The toilets, in particular, are specially designed for tiny houses on foundations and for RVs. 

For example, the water-only toilet is hooked up to a sewer permanently, so you can flush the waste and urine using water only. Meanwhile, a power-only toilet disposes of waste in trash, which will be picked up. 

RVs can also have toilets that use both water and power to dispose of waste, which will then go into black water tanks. 

As for the smell, the key is proper ventilation to induce proper indoor airflow—just like in regular-sized houses.

The myth of poor sanitation with tiny houses does not ring true all the time. It all depends on the owner. So, the critics don’t get a point on this one, even though their concern is valid. 

9. There are many fakes in the industry. 

woodworkers building a tiny house
You have to hire the legit builders and craftsmen even though you’re building a tiny house.

Even builders and suppliers of tiny house models and plans have weighed in on this. In every industry, there are two evils: the greater ones and the lesser ones. 

The greater ones? Those who pretend to be authorities and entice people to buy into this movement using promos and low prices. 

People who unfortunately fall for it are those who are starving for a downsized life. 

Remember, this is a living space of which they are taking advantage—a place where people stay for years. It’s simply not fair for the scammers to use this for their own benefit, without thinking about the impact on those gullible people’s lives. 

This is why even though tiny house advocates have increased in number, their critics in the government and property sectors still exist… They are still pushing against the movement. 

10. Too many legal hoops and obstacles. 

Finally, tiny houses get the disdain from critics because getting one right now is simply complicated. 

Sure, the movement is spreading around the world, but one can’t deny that buying a tiny house is still a major event in a person’s life, even though the house is tiny. 

Here’s the thing about building or even buying a regular house: it’s not that easy. Sure, you can hire a realtor or an appraiser to take care of things for you. However, it will still be a parade of exhaustion and financial setbacks. Did you know that buying a house is one of the most stressful events in life?

Now, imagine getting a property that’s not yet recognized in your state, which market is not too big yet. Indeed, the stress that comes with buying a tiny house will be, ironically, bigger.

This is why critics don’t simply have confidence in tiny houses—one has to buckle up and toughen up before they achieve that downsized, mobile life.  

More about tiny house critics 

The not-so-surprising reasons why critics don’t like tiny houses

why critics don't like tiny houses - little house on the prairie
Tiny houses still don’t attract some people because of simple reasons like space and sanitation.

Restricted common area

In a tiny house, every inch of the floor space and wall space matters. Tiny houses measure under 400 square feet; that’s why any allowance in your common area should only function for mobility and traffic. 

It will just come out as a waste if you give yourself the luxury of allocating spaces for coffee tables, throw pillows, etc. Your guests will have to understand why your common area is small. 

Not enough space for recreation

When you’re not working, what do you do? Read a book, play video games, or paint or draw—or perhaps all of these? You might have difficulty doing recreational activities in a tiny house, especially if you live with a younger kid. 

Just like what we said, the floor space in a tiny house is crucial. You might have to make many adjustments to create a nook for recreational activities. For instance, you might have to make cleanups more frequent to free up space constantly.

Complicated for throwing a party

Do you like throwing gatherings in your home? Sure, it’s not impossible in a tiny house, but it will be more challenging. It might also take more time to prepare. Just think of the waste the guests will inevitably generate and the cleanup after the party. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg!

However, don’t lose hope that quickly. Check out our blog post on how to throw a party at your house. We listed a few tips and some recipes.

Zoning issues

The most blaring barrier to tiny house living is zoning. If you live in a state with strict zoning regulations, it might just be easier to give up and find a better and safer alternative. 

Several states in the U.S. allow tiny house living, but they still have restrictions. Tiny house living is one endeavor you should only explore when you’re ready, and you are financially equipped.

Conclusion 

As you can see, tiny house living is not a fairy tale. Don’t get the wrong ideas about this lifestyle. It requires patience, money, and time to achieve that downsized life. 

If you are dead serious about living in a tiny house, then, by all means, start your research now. Talk to the authorities and get advice from realtors. 

You’d consult a doctor when you’re sick, right? So, it’s best to converse with property experts when you’re itching to live in a tiny house.

If you have any more questions or if you disagree with our list, let us know in the comments below. We’d like to learn from you!

Related questions 

Why is tiny house living illegal? 

Tiny houses are illegal in several states, primarily because of their building and zoning codes. They might not have modified their codes, specifically, the required legal size of a dwelling.

Besides that, tiny houses are also complicated to regulate because of their safety issues from the restricted space.

Can you live in a shed in Oregon? 

It depends on the duration and if you already built the shed in your background. If it’s temporary because your main house is under construction, and if it has comfortable amenities, then it might be okay to reside in the meantime. 

In Oregon, sheds are considered accessory non-habitable structures. However, in Central Oregon, several builders are offering prefabricated sheds. Therefore, it’s possible that you might find some way to live in a shed. You have to clarify with your town’s zoning codes though if you can put a new shed in your backyard. 

What rooms do tiny houses have?

Tiny houses can have bedrooms, kitchen space, bathroom, common area, and lofts, which you can access using a roll-up ladder. The lofts can also serve as sleeping spaces if you have a guest. 

You can also put storage boxes on the loft if you’re short on storage space. RVs or tiny houses on wheels can particularly have two bedrooms, which is one master bedroom and one sleeping area with bunk beds.

Tiny House Security: Ways to Protect Your Tiny House from Theft

Tiny House Security: Ways to Protect Your Tiny House from Theft

tiny house miniature with key
Keeping your tiny house safe and protected is as important as keeping your full-sized house secure.

Stolen tiny houses are not something new. This is because of how mobile tiny houses are that burglars can easily pick them up. The necessity to put the security of your home on top of everything is very important. 

The question is, “How do you keep your tiny home secure?” Well, this awful situation can be avoided if you are well prepared and you have the right tools with you. Remember, it is not just your stuff that you are protecting from being stolen. You are protecting the entire house as well. 

Thus, a simple door lock won’t do the trick. An additional door lock can’t even keep your trailer from getting stolen.

Here are some of the things that you can do to make your tiny house as secure and as easy to find as possible:

1. Make Your Tiny House Immovable 

If your tiny house is immovable then, sure enough, thieves can’t take it with them. Making your tiny house immovable is one great way to prevent your tiny house from getting stolen. To make your tiny house immovable, you have to remove the wheels. 

But of course, you have to secure the wheels too. You can’t just put it anywhere. If possible, lock the wheels up somewhere that isn’t just around where your tiny house is located. This is because thieves will surely look for the wheels first to where your tiny house is parked. 

If your trailers come with an adjustable coupler, then remove it. It is even better if you replace the bolts that hold it with a security bolt. There are a lot of different security bolts available in the market today.

Some are simple while others will require you to use a special keyed wrench just to remove it.  Otherwise, thieves can get around the locks by replacing the locks you have installed. 

Thieves are geniuses but not enough to bring their tires or couplers with them when doing the crime.

2. Lock Up Your Tiny House

Locking up your trailer has never been more convenient with the number of products designed for such function. There are heavy-duty chains that you can run through the walls of your tiny house. Wheel locks that look like the one that towing companies use in securing the towed vehicles are also available. Moreover, there are hitch locks that you can use to prevent the trailer from being attached to a tow vehicle. 

With such wide choices, choosing the best among them is kinda hard. Each of them claims to be effective, but do not simply rely on what they say. You have to do your very own thorough research to make sure that what you will get really works. 

Do not get blinded with their offers. It will help if you watch videos maneuvering such products and read articles about these products. This will help you get the most out of what you are paying.

selective focus of miniature tiny home with red pin and sold tag on wooden floor, Image for real-estate management concept.
Locking up your tiny house will ensure that thieves can’t easily steal your home.

3. Lock the Doors and Windows

What is good about the windows and doors of tiny houses is that they are stronger and of better quality. This is the reason why thieves can’t easily break-in into tiny houses. 

It is very essential that you secure the door of your tiny house with a high-quality door lock. For example, you can use bump proof locks for deadbolts to secure the door of your tiny house. Just be sure that you do not put anything in your door and windows that will stop you from coming out in case of an emergency. 

Securing your doors and windows with good locks are very important. After all, these are the passages where thieves can sneak in. If possible, install double locks for better security. 

Another good option is to install a keyless deadbolt. Aside from keeping your doors secure, this door locks will also make it easier for you to open the door from time to time. You no longer have to fumble around to look for the right key. And, keys can easily get lost or are even hard to use when you are in the dark. 

You can find the types of locks that you can choose from.

4. Install LED Outdoor Safety Lights

A motion-activated is an easy yet good way to prevent thieves from sneaking in. This LED lights will just light up if it detects any motion around it. 

What is good about these lights is that they are solar-powered and waterproof. This means that your electric bill won’t actually rise because of using them. Ideally, these lights should be installed in the corners of your tiny house. 

Each unit of these LED lights come with a battery and a small solar panel. The battery stores power during the day which will be used at night. 

These LED lights work by staying on a very low output level when it’s dark. Then it brightens up if its motion sensors have detected any movement. When they are turned on, the lights can still light up the way. 

LED lights are a good option not just to help you secure your tiny house but to help you see what is happening around during the night as well.

Outdoor LED lamp with motion sensor working above the door that detects movement. Safety concept.
Having motion-activated LED lights make it easier to find out if someone tries to sneak in your tiny house.

5. Have a Security System for your Tiny House 

Finding a security system that perfectly fits your tiny house is very easy nowadays. This is because of the availability of all kinds of security systems out there. A security system is very helpful most especially when you are near other households. 

But if your tiny house is located in a far-flung place, a security system won’t work as effectively as using it in a populated area. After all, a security system needs someone to hear it and respond to the emergency. But this does not mean that you can’t install security systems just because your tiny house is located in a remote area. 

Security systems will always be of help. Thieves can get uncomfortable with an alarm that just doesn’t go off. With this, they will be forced to go away. 

If your tiny house is equipped with an internet connection, you can opt for an alarm that will notify you through your phone in case someone is trying to break in. With this, you can have others check your tiny house in case you are not around. 

The downfall of these security systems is that routers don’t have a backup. So, if the burglar is genius enough to unplug your house first, then you are done. Your Internet connection will go down and you might just find out what happened to your tiny house once you see it. 

To prevent any of these awful events from happening, an alarm that uses the cellular signal to notify is a better option. Just pray that the thief is not that patient to wait for the battery of the alarm to die. 

6. Install Security Cameras 

Security cameras are very held full and are highly effective. You have two options when it comes to security cameras. You can choose a security camera that uploads videos to “the cloud” or go for a security camera that stores their video locally to a digital video recorder (DVR). 

The advantage of using a camera that locally stores that store the recorded video is that they produce a higher quality video. Also, an internet connection is not needed in order for it to work. The thing is when a thief tries to break-in, the DVR might be stolen as well which means that the recorded video would be useless to you. 

On the other hand, security cameras that require an internet connection allow you to store videos offsite. This means that the videos can’t be stolen or destroyed as well. This security camera is connected to the outside world through the internet or cellular network. But these cameras are more expensive. They will also need you to have a separate data plan for each of them. 

Generally speaking, security cameras are a better option when it comes to the protection of your tiny house. This is because they do not just simply secure your tiny house but they can show you who the burglar is.

Conclusion

Securing your tiny house is a very challenging task since it is not just your belonging that you are protecting. You are protecting the entirety of your tiny house at his. That is why it is very important that you do everything you can to secure your tiny house. 

Do everything you can to make sure that your tiny house is safe. Always remember that prevention is better than cure. It is better that you prevent your tiny house from getting stolen than looking for it once it is lost.

Tiny Homes Living: How to Live and Adjust to a Tiny Life

Tiny Homes Living: How to Live and Adjust to a Tiny Life

Woman holding tiny wooden house
As beautiful as it sounds, adjusting to the tiny house lifestyle could be easy as long as you are well prepared.

In most cases, the decision to move into a tiny house is due to financial reasons. Nowadays, the cost of housing keeps on rising. It has become unaffordable to everyone most especially to those who are earning limited income. But with tiny houses, the cost of living is drastically reduced. 

And while money matters keep most things rolling, there will be times that the process of owning a tiny house will become more personal. The focus will drift to the challenges of how you and your family will make it living in a tiny house. How will you start living in a tiny house then?

At first, you will find yourself lost in the middle of nowhere. But eventually, you’ll find the track soon. You might find the transition hard since you’ve been living differently before but in no time, things will get better. 

Living in a tiny house will make you scrutinize the things you own and how you spend your time. This means that you have to thoroughly go through the possessions you have collected and the habits you have developed throughout the years. 

Here are some things that will help you adjust to your tiny house lifestyle. 

Preparation Tips

1. Go Spend Time in a Tiny Space

Obviously, you just can buy or build a tiny house without looking for one that is already built and complete. Ideally, you should not just take a look at it but you should take your time staying in it. 

The tiny house lifestyle is not one size fits all. It is not for everyone. So, it is best for you to spend your time living in one to get the vibe and find out if it works for you. 

Spending your time in a tiny house first before having your own is much better. This will save you from wasting your time and money into something that is not fitted for you. Also, this will give you a grasp of how living in a tiny house is. 

If you are wondering where you can find a tiny house where you can stay for a few days, you can easily find one online. Just make sure that you are booking with a legit owner. Perhaps, this is one of the best ideas to give you a glimpse of how your life will be once you live in a tiny house. 

2. Determine What’s Really Important in Life

If you already have decided to live in a tiny house then it’s high time to start figuring out your wants and needs in life. Tiny houses are around 400 to 500 square feet only. This means that your space is very limited. 

This also means that you have to let go of some if not most of the stuff that you have. This includes the things that you are not actually using that have been piled up in your cabinet. 

You will find yourself choosing between wants and needs. But of course, since you will be living in a tiny house, your needs should be your priority. Having your wants means less space for you. 

Which of the things that you have are you willing to let go? Answering this is very hard most especially when you are sentimental. But you have to go through this process when you want to live in a tiny house. 

Determine the ones that really matter, the ones that are important, the ones that you really and set aside the things that you don’t actually need. Practice living the minimalist lifestyle because you’ll be living with it as long as you are staying in a tiny house. You have to keep things as minimal as possible for lesser clutter and to make your tiny house look better as well.

Tiny house with porch
Living in a tiny house is a big step that is not easy to take when you are not prepared.

3. Start Getting Rid of Your Stuff

Most probably, decluttering is one of the hardest preparations for living in a tiny house. Letting go of your stuff, even just the ‘junk’, is not as easy as it sounds. But believe us, it feels good to let go of the things that you have accumulated through the years – the ones that you are not using and just displayed there. 

Just the mere fact of taking out the clothes you are not using is hard. But this will give you satisfaction. It will make you rejoice for how far you’ve come due to your tiny house living plans. 

If you are already living in a tiny house lifestyle, you are already used to being a minimalist. If it is your first time, you’ll have a head time, but don’t worry, you’ll get there. 

You might find your closet lacking before but actually, you have more than what is needed when living in a tiny house. All this time, you are living with too much stuff because you believed that you needed them when in reality, you don’t. 

You thought that it makes your house look more beautiful, but it just made it look cluttered. You are so used to every single thing that is placed inside your house that letting go of any of them is difficult. But that is how it goes. You have decided to live in a tiny house, so bear with it. 

No-fuss. Living in a tiny house could be one of your best decisions ever. Your stuff might mean something to you, but you don’t have to dwell on them forever. Besides, it will just make your tiny house small.

So, go. Pack the things that you need and let go of the things that you don’t need. You won’t regret it, promise. The results will make you thank yourself for doing it.

4. Learn to Ignore the Critics

Critics won’t just go anywhere. They will always be there. They will always have a say on everything you do. So, ignore them. 

Most probably, they will have something to say again with your decision to live in a tiny house. They will get every single chance that they have to question your decision to live in a tiny house. Do not let them change your plans. In simpler terms, do not listen to them. 

Do not let them decide for you. You, for sure, know what you want. Go for it. 

Instead of listening to their nonsense opinion, listen to people who support you with your decision. Be with the people who share the same interest as you. The ones who know how the tiny house lifestyle is. 

At this point, negative vibes are not welcome. As always, stay on the positive side. Let’s face it. Deciding to live in a tiny house is scary, but is not as scary as letting others decide for you. 

5. Stop Being a Crazed Consumer

Nowadays, living in a big space feels like a must and owning a lot of stuff is a need. But realistically speaking, living in a big space with a lot of stuff depends on how responsible you are in maintaining them. 

The society today is very consumerist. You believed that you have to buy more and more to be happy and satisfied. You believed that you need to own a lot of stuff to be on top. 

It is very important that you stop this lifestyle and do not fall for this notion again once you live in a tiny house. Admit it, you are as guilty as us when it comes to us. But it is time to change that lifestyle and start being a minimalist. 

Their offer might sound good but that’s how it really is. Marketing is their forte, always remember that. You don’t actually need the latest and most innovative products to keep you living. They are not the air that you breathe or the food that you eat. 

Stop being a crazed customer. Start purchasing the ones that are just really needed. You don’t have to live with the hype.

Mobile tiny house interior. Great for outdoor experiences and wildlife. Lots of space and pure adventure. No need for special authorizations, only a decent car to pull this tiny house and off you go.
With such limited space, having your own personal space is almost impossible not unless you are creative and resourceful.

6. Define Your Idea of Meaningful Space

In the house where you are living right now, which of the spaces that you have mean so much to you? What part of the house do you spend most of your time? Which space could you not imagine not having?

It’s time to start figuring out the spaces in your house that mean a lot to you. This will help you come up with the best plan for your tiny house and tiny life. 

Traditional houses have a lot of spaces which you can’t have in a tiny house. Besides, the spaces that you have in a tiny house is the miniature version of everything. So, which of the spaces are you willing to let go of?

Knowing the space that means a lot to you is your very first step towards planning your tiny house. This is very important in order for you to maximize your tiny house. This will also keep you away from wasting any space. 

Remember, every inch of space matters when you are living in a tiny house. It is understandable that you want every single part of a traditional house, but you just can’t. So, start weighing which of the spaces are the heaviest to you.

7. Find Your Tiny House Community

Just like you, there are a lot of people who want to live in a tiny house too. They are everywhere, waiting for you. And, they are very ready to give you all the information that you need to kick start your tiny house life. 

With them, you will get the advice that you need in order to begin. How will you find them out?

Start by searching for tiny homes near you. Find groups of tiny house owners on Facebook. Get in touch with bloggers of tiny houses. Ask people you know in case they know someone who owns a tiny house. 

There are actually a lot of things that you can do to widen your connection with tiny house owners. This step is very important when preparing to live in a tiny house. Why?

More or less, these people are the ones who know about building codes, zoning, and constructing and living in a tiny house. With them, you can get the information that you need in order to keep you going. It’s time to outsource all the information that you need in order for you to survive the tiny house lifestyle.

Things to Consider when Planning to Live in a Tiny House

Sussex County NJ USA June 17 2017 Inside a tiny house at a tiny house expo
There are a lot of things that you have to consider when planning to live in a tiny house for a smoother transition.

1. Toilet 

Living in a tiny house isn’t exactly the same as living in a traditional house. This means that you have to deal with problems you are not dealing with before. And that includes problems with a toilet. 

Choosing the right toilet for your tiny house is a very important and critical decision that you have to face. Having the right toilet in your tiny house will not just make you feel comfortable but will also save you from any problem soon. If you want to travel from one place to another with your tiny house, then you have to look for a good alternative to the traditional flush toilet. 

Keep in mind that you have to keep your toilet at a limited space due to your already limited space. Soundproofing your toilet also matters. Sure enough, you don’t want to be embarrassed with the sounds that you make when using the toilet.

2. Personal Space

If you have tried living in a dorm, you probably know the struggle of not having your own personal space. Having time on your own is very difficult given the tight same that dorm rooms offer. And with the limited space that tiny houses have to offer, you have to be as creative as you can to have your very own personal space. 

A good way to have your very own personal space on your tiny house is to divide your house strategically. You can use curtains to have some privacy. You could also make use of wall dividers if you want. 

Also, in as much as possible, do not let anyone enter your room. Keep that space for yourself only. You could share the rest of the space with others but at least have something you can call your own. 

3. Lights 

It can be very easy for small spaces to feel and get dark. This makes it very important to have a light source wherever it is possible. The light source could either be natural or not. 

Have big windows in your tiny house where natural light can pass through. Natural lights can do magic. They can easily lift up and set the mood of your tiny house. 

When you have a good number of windows, do not cover them up with curtains. It is even better if you don’t put curtains at all. If not, use blinds to cover-up your windows during the night. 

To control the amount of light in your tiny house, install recessed lighting that has dimmer switches. You could also put string lights in nooks and lamps in corners. When setting up lights, it would be better to have them hanged to save space and expand the space visually.

4. Maintenance 

In maintaining your tiny house, don’t let yourself stay in repair mode. Fix any damage repaired as soon as possible. Do regular maintenance checks as well. 

Doing regular maintenance check is very important in order to find out any problem and prevent it from getting more serious. Living in a tiny house doesn’t mean that you are exempted from maintaining it. Besides, you have to be more keen on it most especially when you are on the move. 

Some of the things that you have to regularly check include roof leaks, appliance upkeep problems, and plumbing and electrical issues. If what you have is a mobile tiny house, the tires, brakes, and bearings also have to be checked.

When planning or already living in a tiny house, do not forget to maintain it. Maintaining your tiny house plays a pivotal role in how long your tiny house will last. It also has something to do with your safety, so make this your priority.

5. Lifestyle

The tiny house lifestyle isn’t the same as the lifestyle you’re used to. Remember, your tiny house isn’t just a house, it’s a lifestyle. And, you have to adapt to that lifestyle. 

If you are into the arts, then make sure that everything will still look clean and organized once you are done doing your stuff. If you can’t live without a dryer, then you should have a bigger space. In such a case, it would even be better to have your tiny house built on a foundation. 

Do not forget that you can always customize your tiny house. Do not settle for anything less. Feel free to do whatever you want with your tiny house. Just make sure that you do not overdo anything.

Tips For Adjusting To Life In A Tiny House

Small white kitchen, red components
IT is not easy to adjust to the tiny house lifestyle, but being prepared will make it easy.

Over the past few years, the tiny house movement has become a very trending topic. It’s growing popularity has invited a lot of people. But, they just see this as a bigger dollhouse, not something that they could see themselves living in. 

This is because the idea of transitioning from a big house into an ultra-small one isn’t attractive to others. But then again, tiny houses exist for a reason – the so-called “modern conveniences”. So, how will you adjust to living in a tiny house?

Here are some of the most common questions asked about the concept of tiny house living which will help you prepare and adjust to this lifestyle.

1. How Do You Fit My 3-Bedroom Lifestyle into a Tiny House?

At a maximum, tiny houses only measure 500 square feet. This means that you have to put everything you necessarily need in such a limited space. This could be not your piece of cake. 

This means that you and your family should figure out the stuff that you necessarily need in order to live. Regardless of your effort, it would be impossible to put everything you have with such a limited space. So, minimalism is the key. 

Bring only the ones that you really need – from clothes, the decorative pieces and more. It would also be good if you do the one thing in, one thing out practice. This way, your tiny house will not look cramped. 

This doesn’t mean that you can’t have a little luxury. Of course, you can. You just have to keep things at a minimum. Remember to focus on the quality over the quantity of the items that you have.

2. Where Do You Put Your Clothes?

Just like everyone else, you probably have a lot of clothes. Some, if not most, of these clothes are still unused yet you just can’t let them go. This is because you thought you could use it one day. 

But once you have decided to live in a tiny house, this mindset is not applicable. Living in a tiny house entails reducing the number of clothes that you have. But this does not necessarily mean that you have to eliminate all the clothes you have.

This does not also mean that you should have four outfits only. That’s not how it goes. When loving in a tiny house, it would be better if you go for an interchangeable wardrobe. You could also opt for multipurpose clothes. 

This way, you save space and money at the same time. You can also go away from getting frustrated by deciding what you should wear. 

3. What about Cooking and Cleaning?

You might be wondering how you will cook in your tiny house. Cooking in a tiny house doesn’t mean that you will cook on your child’s tiny range. There are a lot of compact appliances that you can purchase for your tiny house. 

In fact, there are already appliances that are specifically made for tiny houses. These appliances will perfectly fit your tiny house as long as it is designed well. This means that you can still cook the way you do in your big house. 

You could also have an outdoor cooking space if you want. An outdoor kitchen is perfect if you want to camp or grill every now and then. You can also custom build your kitchen in a way that will perfectly fit your kitchen appliances.

4. Are the Bathrooms Outside?

Not unless you want to have your bathroom outside, the bathroom of a tiny house is inside. Tiny house bathrooms have been well adapted to tiny houses. Besides, most tiny house builders customize the bathroom in order for it to fit in a tiny house. 

Despite their size, tiny houses are still equipped with the smaller version of the necessities of personal hygiene. And throughout the years, tiny house builders have come up with creative ways to incorporate bathroom luxuries into tiny houses. These luxuries come in compact sizes. 

The toilet in a tiny house is compact but is not as tiny as you think. You can still use them comfortably. You do not have to worry that you will be getting out of balance. There’s no big difference in using a regular toilet.

5. Am I Supposed to Live Without a Garage?

There is no such tiny house rule which stops you from owning a few properties. You could still have separate space as you want and need. Have a different or adjoining room for spaces such as your office, craft room, garage and so much more. 

Living in a tiny house, but this doesn’t mean that you have to stop doing what you love just because you do not have the space to do so. You could always have a separate space for that. Besides, living in a tiny house could save you money which you can use to meet your other needs. 

When you have a car that requires you to have a garage, feel free to have one. You could have it adjoined into your tiny house or place it in a different place as long as it is near you.

Conclusion

Deciding to live in a tiny house is one of the bravest things you can do. The start may be hard but you’ll enjoy it as time goes by. Do not let the challenges bring you down, let it be your inspiration to go through. 

Related Questions

How long does it take for me to adjust to the tiny house lifestyle?

Adjusting to the tiny house lifestyle could take months or years. It all depends on you. Adjusting could be easy if you have planned to live in a tiny house for so long and if you are very willing to go through the process as well. Just remember that forcing yourself to adapt to the lifestyle won’t help. Let yourself adjust naturally. Adjusting is a step by step process, not a one time process. 

Is it better if I live alone first in a tiny house?

Ideally, you should have someone with you in the first few days that you will be living in your tiny house. This will help you adjust faster to the tiny house lifestyle. Living alone right when you moved into your tiny house could make it hard for you to adjust.

Tiny Home Living: The Hidden Costs

Tiny Home Living: The Hidden Costs

Sure, the concept of tiny home living is attractive. For some, it’s their long-time dream. But what about the hidden costs of tiny home living? 

At a glance, you might spend more if you add upgrades, if you need external storage, or even if you raise a little kid. You also have to face zoning regulations. 

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. 

That is why we listed these potential hidden costs. We are not aiming to discourage you from tiny home living; we just want to warn you of the possible financial roadblocks ahead. 

Hidden costs of tiny home living

1. Upgrades

The one benefit of owning a tiny house is saving on home expenses, compared to having a regular size dwelling. 

For example, tiny house residents in Orlando only spend less than $1000 every month for their home-related expenses. Meanwhile, according to Pocket Sense, the average American family of 2 spends $5,005 per month to maintain their lifestyle. 

Living in a tiny house, you can definitely save more disposable income. 

However, whether it’s necessary or not, you will eventually have to pay for house upgrades if you live in a tiny house. These particular hidden costs of tiny home living will even be more likely with a tiny house on wheels.

Such, inevitably, those upgrades will pile up on your monthly home expenses. 

Several of those installations might be a newer (or better) HVAC system, a solar panel, or an alarm device. Other maintenance and towing necessities will also add up more quickly to your home-related budget.

So, you have to watch out for that. 

Tiny Homes: What Is the True Cost of Living Small? 

2. External storage

Being in a restricted space, one of the most obvious concerns you might deal with is storage.

Sure, you can find plenty of storage-saving hacks online and they are easy to follow. However, eventually, your stuff will multiply—especially if you’re living with a kid. 

You can’t forever rely on storage containers because you need space for them to occupy. As a result, some tiny house residents have even used their lofts as storage space. 

The consequences? Dust and poor indoor airflow. 

So, what happens when you already filled every nook and cranny in your house with things? Well, you might now have to spend on additional outdoor storage.

 The average fee for renting a storage unit is $40 to $50, and that’s just a 5×5 unit. The price will vary based on the size of the facility and unit and its location.

Urban places, of course, have higher annual and monthly fees. 

3. Your town’s zoning laws 

This is one of the more complicated and potentially expensive hidden costs of tiny home living—dealing with your town’s zoning codes. 

Zoning laws are important because they help residents live peacefully without the commercial hustle and bustle from businesses that disturb neighborhoods. Similarly, zoning laws also protect businesses from trespassing residents in an area. 

You’re lucky if you live in a state that is relaxed about the Tiny House Movement; however, if you don’t, you might have to adjust and pay for fees. Moreover, if you violate a zoning code in your state, the consequences might be brutal. 

It is even more challenging, considering residential zone areas are not that many these days. So, if you want to build a tiny house in a non-residential land, then you might have to request for a zone change. This involves an application, a payment, which depends on the locality, and a hearing with the zoning board. 

On top of that, your tiny house has to pass building code compliance. But to do that, you have to be a certified tiny house manufacturer, which will cost you more than a thousand dollars and requires submitting a dozen qualifications. 

Meanwhile, you can expect looser zoning codes if your house is on wheels, which is considered a recreational vehicle (RV). 

And, if your town isn’t that friendly with tiny houses, you can also advocate for the changing of its zoning laws

4. The appliances 

Haven’t bought a tiny house yet? Well, prepare an allowance for appliances, because customized equipment for tiny houses can cost more.  

Sure, you can find some fully furnished prefab tiny houses; however, one size doesn’t fit all, right? Your family might have specific needs the prefab can’t provide. Moreover, your needs might change over time. 

For example, if you have a tiny house on wheels, you might have to spend on a compact heater if you’re commuting to colder places like Wyoming or Vermont.

Additionally, you might have to spend on battery or solar panels for your other off-the-grid appliances.

One thing you should also consider, besides the cost of your appliances, is the hidden price you’re paying for your appliances. 

Some cheap appliances might be noisier than their expensive competitors. For example, be wary of the noise that some “eco-toilets”, Roombas, and water pumps make.

Knowing you’re in a tiny house, where sound can quickly travel, this will be a hassle. So, when buying appliances, you have to think about that as well. 

5. Insurance

yellow tiny house on wheels

In the past, insurance has not been kind to tiny house owners. Tiny houses that are towed by an SUV or a truck, which are considered RVs, are not even covered by traditional homeowners’ insurance. 

The good news is that insurance options for tiny houses are slowly increasing. Still, it greatly depends on the location and their laws about tiny houses. So, if you’re living in a state that acknowledges their existence with fair regulations, then you’re fortunate. 

Tiny houses on foundations and tiny houses on wheels have different insurance policies. Interestingly, the cost doesn’t stray far away from a traditional regular size house.

According to the Home Insurance Learning Center, a tiny house’s annual insurance can cost up to $1,500. Factors such as the house’s materials, location, and level of difficulty to repair will also affect that amount. 

6. Your tolerance and patience 

Finally, the often-overlooked ones—you will probably lose a lot of patience and tolerance in your tiny home living. 

From your buying/building journey to your living stage, you will deal with different personalities, trials, setbacks, and more. It’s totally normal to go through those, but you can avoid those by studying what you’re heading to. 

If you’re hiring a contractor, make sure they understand your journey. Not only do they have to be skilled and fast with the deliverables, but they should also empathize with your woes as well. 

Fortunately, with everything going digital right now, it’s easy to scrape the web for a tiny house supplier’s reputation. Get to know them through tiny house owners’ forums on Facebook, Reddit, etc. 

Conclusion 

As you can see, every dream has prices—and that includes the hidden costs of tiny home living. That is why before you rush to buy your dream tiny house, take a few steps back and plan properly.

Never forget to save up for an allowance for these hidden expenses in your tiny home journey. 

Related questions

How much does it cost to build a tiny house in California?

The starting cost of a tiny house in California is $40,000. Depending on many factors such as location, materials, and zoning codes, it can cost you more than $100,000.

How do you build a tiny house?

It all depends on your construction experience, budget, and personal preferences. You can either buy a blueprint from a tiny house provider and then build it yourself. Or, you can also order prefab tiny houses and the supplier will ship it to your location. Check out our blog post about tiny house marketplaces to know more.

Raising a Kid in a Tiny House: Yeah or Nah?

Raising a Kid in a Tiny House: Yeah or Nah?

Have you been thinking about raising a kid in a tiny house? This decision is way major than you think. 

Why? Well, you have to think about your finances, your furniture, and even the ethics behind the act itself… Is it even humane to raise a little kid in a tiny house? For a penny-pinching parent, this can be puzzling.

So, raising a kid in a tiny house: yeah or nah? If you’re willing to compromise with the challenges and growing pains along the way, then it might be just worth it. If you’re not in the right place or financial situation to raise a kid in a restricted space, then we don’t recommend it. 

If you’re still on the fence about making a solid decision, don’t worry. In this post, we listed the important considerations of raising a kid in a tiny house. 

By the end of this post, perhaps you can decide better if it’s worth it or not. 

Raising a kid in a tiny house: Things to consider

We’re not talking about a little baby here. We’re talking about a kid who already pitter-patters around the house, mouths words, and demands toys. Therefore, you should be anything but rash in deciding to raise them in a little house. 

A lot of things can happen, most of which you won’t even anticipate. So, before you jump on the bandwagon, carefully mull over these factors first. 

1. The ethics of the act itself

a kid playing with wooden blocks.
Is it right to raise a kid in a tiny house?

Raising a child is both rewarding and challenging. The sad thing is most parents rarely feel the former. 

Now, if you’re stuck in making a decision that involves them, just think about this: it’s about your kid, not you. 

It’s not enough to love a child. You also have to meet their needs, which will be drastically different than yours. Moreover, since they will depend on you, you have to put your interests behind theirs. 

These are your kids’ early childhood needs that you should fulfill, which is based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Basic needs. 

a little boy playing with a fat cat.
Make sure your little one is comfy in a cramped space.

Anything that they need to live and breathe—adequate food, shelter, and clothing. Make sure you can supply those needs for them, despite living in a tiny house or moving around constantly. 

Comfort needs.

We’re not just talking about a soft bed or a sturdy study table for them. Comfort needs are also things that maintain consistency, such as a routine. Having one will help make your child feel secure. 

Psychological needs. 

According to childcare experts, toddlers’ psychological needs develop quickly. That’s why you need to establish a healthy relationship with them early on. If you think a tiny house is not a hindrance to sustaining that, then carry on. 

Are you absolutely confident that you can provide those needs in a tiny house? If yes, then maybe you can move forward with your decision. 

2. Your finances

a little girl choosing dresses in a rack of clothes.
Kids’ needs can quickly change.

One thought that might be floating in your mind is: 

The purpose of living in a tiny house is to save money… so, why worry about my finances for my kids?” 

Oh, what a naive thought. 

Sure, compared to living in a larger house, you can save more money in utility bills when residing in a small abode. However, it’s different when you’re raising a kid. 

You have to budget even tighter since they grow quickly, which means their needs will also multiply. Case in point: a 2-year-old will have way simpler needs than a 3-year-old who’s going to preschool. 

Add that to the hidden costs of owning a tiny house, and your budget plan will likely fluctuate from time to time. This makes budgeting a battle. 

Moreover, since space is limited in your home, you have to practice a “quality over quantity” mindset. That means you will really have to spend on long-lasting, space-saving stuff, which sometimes costs more than regular house stuff. 

3. The furniture

kids' furniture in a bedroom.
You have to be extra picky with your kids’ furniture.

When you think of furniture pieces in a tiny house, you want comfortable and space-saving. But you’re missing some aspects. 

Since you will be living with a kid, opt for furniture with kid-friendly materials. That means water-proof, sturdy components, and dark-hued fabrics, since spillage is likely to happen. 

Some kid-friendly fabrics are the following: 

  • Leather, which is very much water-proof but also elegant. 
  • Microfiber, which is stain-resistant and feels nice to the skin. 
  • Wool, which is reliable and doesn’t tear easily. 

Another good point to consider is the design and function. 

Having kids (or even just one), you will definitely need more storage. You will also require something with more than one purpose. This way, you can avoid spending on more equipment, which will occupy more space. 

As a result, look for dual-purpose furniture for kids such as:

  • Wall-mounted table with a chalkboard on one side. 
  • Adjustable high-chair, which you can also use since you can change the sitting height. 
  • 3-in-1 table—coffee table, chair, and bedside table in one. 
  • Collapsible stools, beds, and couches with added storage underneath. 
  • Loft bed with desk and storage underneath. 

4. Privacy

a mom trying to work on her laptop but exhausted by the presence of her kid.

Your child should run free and play, just like how every other kid should. But if you are residents in a tiny house, this might become a challenge for both of you. 

Your kid might easily bother you since there’s little space for them to explore inside your house. On the other hand, a child also needs some alone time every now and then. 

So, what will you do? Here are some solutions. 

First, set some rules.

 If your kid is already old enough to recognize rules and consequences, then don’t hesitate to establish a few. For example, if you work at home, make it a rule not to run around inside during the day. 

Buy noise-canceling headphones. 

Another solution is to buy noise-canceling headphones. Yep. It’s as easy as that. Think of it as an investment—noise-canceling headphones will give you peace wherever you are and whatever happens around you.  

Put the playspace at the loft. 

Just lay down some colorful mats, comfy blankets, and toy bins, and you’re good to go. You can also put railings on the stairs if they try to break out of baby jail time. 

Let them play outside.

If you’re confident about the safety of your area, then let them run free. Besides, kids need to explore and play with dirt occasionally, so their immune system will toughen up

5. The kid

a working mom dressing up her kid
Think about your kid, too.

Finally, the most crucial consideration of them all… the kids! 

If your kid is already old enough to voice out their opinions, they might be against living in a tiny house. 

Although you still have the final say, it’s important that you still consider their personality and their thoughts about it. What if they’re extroverted or claustrophobic? What if they don’t just feel living in a tiny abode? 

Making a decision will be extra difficult for you. 

Nevertheless, don’t forget to put them in your thoughts when deciding. Through this, you will also determine how to make a small residence more welcoming for them and more productive for their growth.

The verdict

And the verdict is… totally up to you. 

Are you willing to compromise in most of those factors we mentioned? If yes, then you should raise your kid in a tiny house. If you’re not committed to making big changes, then it’s best if you delay in raising a kid in a tiny house.

Related questions 

Is it okay to live in a tiny house with a baby?

Yes, provided that you prepare the tiny house before you move in. Make sure there’s ample storage for the baby’s nappies, clothes, cleaning products, etc. You also have to babyproof the stairs if you have a loft. Check out our post about living in a tiny house with a baby for more tips.

How do you protect your privacy in a tiny house?

If your house is on wheels, buy a good hitch lock or a wheel lock. You can also attach a GPS tracker in a hidden place. If it’s secured by a foundation, then you can install a home security system. For a tiny house, a simple alarm device for your door can already help. 

Tiny House Safety: 5 Major Safety Issues You Can’t Ignore

Tiny House Safety: 5 Major Safety Issues You Can’t Ignore

Living in a small quaint house sure does sound like a dream. And with the Tiny House Movement, that dream isn’t far from reach for many. Nevertheless, you still have to face issues such as tiny house safety.

Just because you’re living in a tiny house doesn’t mean you’re free from hazards. Below, we discuss these five crucial safety issues of living in a tiny house. 

5 major tiny house safety issues

In the US, you will find many different types of small housing. The tiny house that we’re describing below is any dwelling that measures less than 400 square feet and is built on foundations, as defined by this review. 

If you’re planning to live in a tiny house, you have to face reality. Having one isn’t a walk in real estate park. Read on to know more.

1. Fire hazards

burnt roof of an old house.
Burnt roof of an old tiny house

There are two common fire hazards in most tiny houses—combustible materials and space heaters. 

If a tiny house is built with combustible materials, and you use gas or electric heaters and gas stoves, the fire risk is greater. 

For example, plywood fire is a Class A fire, which means the fire can spread easily on a structure built with plywood. Therefore, if you’re planning to buy or build a tiny house, consider other non-combustible materials. 

Fiberglass, for example, won’t burn when it catches fire—instead, it will just melt. Besides that, it’s also lightweight, strong, and an excellent heat insulator, which means you can rely on it during cold nights. 

Moreover, because it’s a tiny house, you should watch out for space heaters. Appliances like space heaters commonly cause deadly fires in US homes because they easily overheat.  

2. Carbon monoxide poisoning

a hand holding a white carbon monoxide detector device.
This CO detector will help save lives.

Carbon Monoxide (CO) poisoning is a common house hazard, but it’s deadlier than others since it’s colorless and odorless. Therefore, it’s very tricky to detect without a device, making it even more critical in a tight space with poorly designed ventilation. 

Since a tiny house is often tightly sealed, you have to be three times careful with equipment. A gas-powered kitchen range, especially, gives off a lot of CO when you start it. 

The CO level in your kitchen’s air elevates even more when you don’t use a range hood when using your gas range. So, don’t forget to use that range hood to reduce the harm of CO. 

Are you still serious about living in a tiny house? Besides using a range hood when cooking, you can also invest in a carbon monoxide detector. In the US, 27 states mandate residential buildings with fossil-fuel burning devices to install at least one CO alarm. 

Other cost-effective ways to prevent CO poisoning is making sure your kitchen is well-ventilated and letting a qualified pro inspect your gas range for combustion safety. 

3. Indoor air quality 

female Asian disgusted of indoor air quality in her house.
Indoor air quality has long-term effects on wellness.

Indoor air quality is a significant factor in your wellness. Whether you’re in a tiny house or a workspace, the indoor air quality will affect your physical health and even your productivity. According to this study, people perform poorly if they work in an area with terrible indoor air quality. 

Now, in a typical residential house, improving the indoor air quality can be as simple and cheap as opening the doors and windows. However, in a tiny house, it can be a bit trickier. Compared to a wider space, where the moisture can dilute better, a tiny house with poor indoor air quality will bring you many issues. 

Humidity problem

First, you might encounter a humidity problem. When a house in an already humid area develops a high level of air moisture, it will pose some risks to the occupants. People’s bodies might not cool down easily, exposing them to a risk of heat strokes. 

Allergies

Another issue you might encounter with a humid place is allergies. Dust mites thrive on air moisture since they can’t absorb water. Their waste is particularly dangerous, as it can trigger allergic reactions like red eyes, sneezing, runny nose, inflammation, and itchiness. 

Costlier electricity bills

With poor quality and circulation, a tiny house’s indoor air will easily allow dust buildup in the HVAC systems or Air Conditioning (AC) units. And if they do have dust buildup, they will work harder to maintain the required level of heat exchange in your house. What comes next will be a series of repairs or high utility bills. 

4. Mobility inside the house

wooden interiors of a tiny house
Any occupant should be able to move freely inside a tiny house.

Mobility may be the well-known benefit of tiny houses, especially for the elderly who can still take care of themselves. Since all the facilities are near each other and easily accessible, older people won’t need to walk several meters just to relieve themselves. 

However, mobility inside a tiny house might pose safety risks for most people.

For example, if a person injures themselves, and they use a wheelchair, their dwelling needs to have enough space to cater to wheelchair mobility. However, it’s rare for a tiny house to have ramps. 

Another concern is the occupants doing different activities in the house at the same time. What if one person is cooking and another person is fixing something nearby?

They should be able to move freely to avoid bumping into each other. The stairs inside a tiny house shouldn’t be too steep as well to prevent falls and slips. 

The point here is a tiny house should supply adequate mobility for each occupant. You can’t ignore this issue because people’s needs change, and so do their activities in the house.

5. Mold growth 

disgusting mold growth on a white wall.
Long-term exposure to mold growth will worsen underlying upper respiratory diseases.

Mold growth is another crucial safety concern in a tiny house. 

Humid spaces enable the growth of mold. Therefore, any small signs of growth in a poorly ventilated tiny house will blow up to a mold infestation in no time.

Wooden materials are especially notorious breeding grounds for mold. If you notice a rotten wood smell or a musty smell, you might be having a huge mold infestation. You should not dismiss this and identify the source. 

If you find mold, you can instantly get rid of it. You can either use a soap and water solution or bleach to remove mold from a wooden surface. Bleach is a known mold killer.

Mold is dangerous for a number of reasons, just like the following. 

  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Asthma 
  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Sneezing
  • Stuffy nose
  • Red and itchy eyes

If a person has a compromised immune system or an undiagnosed lung problem, they should be extra careful of living in tiny houses. They are more at risk for complications if they get exposed to mold. 

Final thoughts

Do you still think tiny houses are good investments? If you do, then never forget to address these five safety risks we listed. Tiny houses already have a bad rap to the public, so don’t add fuel to the fire by being even more careless with your tiny home. 

Related questions 

How do you avoid mold growth in a tiny house? 

To avoid mold growth in a tiny house, make sure to fix any roof leaks immediately. Make it a habit to open the windows and doors frequently if possible to allow better air circulation inside the house. Finally, ensure that you have properly functioning vents. Tiny houses easily get wet inside.

Are tiny houses safe? 

Living one will surely not expose you to fatal conditions. It can also withstand storms and strong winds if it’s properly designed and constructed. However, just like the ones we listed here, you will still encounter major safety issues, and you should be ready to address them. 

Where To Find A Tiny Home Builder: A Comprehensive List

Where To Find A Tiny Home Builder: A Comprehensive List

tiny home builder united states map

A tiny home builder is a company that specializes in building a tiny house, be it mobile or stationary. If you ever want to own or live in a micro-housing unit, they are the guys you can count on. Which begs the question, are there are any tiny home designers near you?

There are hundreds of tiny home builders in the US. Almost every state has at least one tiny house builder in it.  They are mostly in counties and townships, whose zoning laws are more lenient in the construction of micro-housing. 

Furthermore, tiny home builders also offer a wide range of services such as placing insulation, interior design, deck construction, and more. Some companies also sell tiny home blueprints and floor plans so their customers can build their own units.

Some builders also offer real estate solutions such as a vacant lot in their partner tiny house community where you can park your unit. Additionally, they can even assist you in registering your tiny home as a Recreational Vehicle (RV).

Furthermore, some companies also host seminars about everything there is to know about the Tiny House Movement. If you are lucky, they may even teach you how to build your own tiny home unit for a minimal fee. 

 In this post, we have listed the location of the most reputable tiny house builders in the country. 

CLARA tiny home builder

Tiny Home Builders in the US Sorted By State 

1. Alabama

Alabama is known for its countryside scenery, including the beaches of the Gulf Coast in the south and breathtaking mountain ranges in the north. Tiny house builders in the state construct units that can adapt to warm and  rainy weather. Many of the companies here build tiny homes with cooling vents, and most prefer materials that are resistant to mildew and surface moss. 

  • AL Tiny Homes

Website: www.altinyhomes.com 

Address: 653 Lester Doss Road, Warrior, AL 

  • Atkinson Homes and Cottages

Website: www.atkinsoncottages.com

Address: 33230 US Highway 280, Childersburg, AL

  • Harmony Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: Oxford, AL

  • Timbercraft Tiny Homes

Website: www.timbercrafttinyhomes.com

Address: 230 Convict Camp Rd, Guntersville, AL

2. Alaska

The northernmost part of the US has icy cold winters that require tiny homes to have thicker insulations. Hence, tiny home builders here go for maximizing interior space that can efficiently regulate the heat inside. They also design their units to have roofs and walls that can support heavy snow load. 

  • Tundra Tiny Houses

Website: https://tundratiny.com/ 

Address: 17571 W Lesser Canada Dr, Wasilla, AL

  • Tiny Timber Homes

Website: https://tundratiny.com/

Address: 17571 W Lesser Canada Dr, Wasilla, AL

3. Arizona

Arizona is known for its arid climate, especially its southwestern desserts, where daytime temperature can climb up to 105 and 115 degrees Fahrenheit. For this reason, most tiny homes here are built with large windows and air conditioning. Some builders also install solar panels to take advantage of its mostly sunny climate.

  • Uncharted Tiny Homes

Website:http://www.unchartedtinyhomes.com/

Address: 24820 N. 16th Ave Ste. 170, Phoenix, AZ

  • Tiny Treasure Homes

Website: http://www.tinytreasurehomes.com/

Address: Cave Creek, AZ

  • LuxTiny

Website: http://www.luxtiny.com/

Address: 1412 Amanda Dr Lakeside, AZ

  • Cinder Box- Micro Dwelling

Website: https://www.cinderboxdwelling.com/

Address: Phoenix, AZ

4. Arkansas

Arkansas has a humid subtropical, much like the rest of the southeastern US. They have steamy summers and relatively mild winters., which many of the builders consider when constructing micro-housing units. The state is also a great outdoor destination, especially the Ozark area. 

  • Slabtown Customs Tiny Houses

Website: None

Address: 602 E Webb St., Mountain View, AR

  • Davis Portable Buildings Arkansas

Website: http://davisportablebuildingsarkansas.com/

Address: Bo, Jeff, Larenda, 301 E. Broadway, Glenwood, AR

5. California

California is the perfect state for outdoor lovers. However, millions of residents were affected during the housing crisis and have found tiny houses as a good residential alternative. California tiny house builders offer a wide range of design and style for their diverse clientele. 

  • Zen Cottages

Website: https://www.zentinyhomes.com/

Address: 227 Rosebay Dr, Encinitas, CA

  • Molecule Tiny Homes

Website: http://moleculetinyhomes.blogspot.com/

Address: Santa Cruz, CA

  • Humble Handcraft

Website: https://www.humblehandcraft.com/

Address: 185 N Olive St, Ventura, CA

  • Avava Dwellings

Website: http://www.avavadwellings.com/

Address: Berkeley, CA

6. Colorado

When you say Colorado, people immediately think of its magnificent mountains, outdoor activities, and winter sports. This combination of nature and a laid back ambiance has made the state the center of the Tiny House Movement. Builders here have different specialties in constructing mountain friendly dwellings. 

  • Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Website: https://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/

Address: 1450 Valley St, Colorado Springs, CO

  • Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses

Website: https://rockymountaintinyhouses.com/ 

Address: 777 Sawmill Rd, Durango, CO

  • Sprout Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: 45825 Highway 96 East, Building 583 E, Pueblo, CO

  • MitchCraft Tiny Homes

Website: http://mitchcrafttinyhomes.com/

Address: 233 US-287, Fort Collins, CO

  • Tiny Diamond Homes

Website: https://www.tinydiamondhomes.com/ 

Address: Littleton, CO

7. Connecticut 

Connecticut has a temperate climate with warm summers and mild winters. They also have magnificent trails and gorgeous scenery in the Berkshire mountains. In the next few years, it wouldn’t be surprising if tiny home activities will increase in this state. 

  • There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

8. Delaware 

Delaware is another state famous for its beaches and hiking trails. The state has a moderate climate. Unfortunately, it has yet to establish tiny home communities in the state. 

  • There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

9. Florida

Florida is one of the tiny house friendly states. Retirees and snowbirds flock the state thanks to the numerous activities you can do here. Overall, it has a lot of tiny house community where you can park your mobile home or settle your unit permanently. 

  • Sanctuary Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.sanctuarytinyhomes.com/ 

Address: 485 S Shell Rd suite 7b, DeBary, FL

  • Blue Ox Bungalows

Website: None

Address:1060 E Industrial Drive Suite U, Orange City, FL

  • Cornerstone Tiny Homes

Website: https://cornerstonetinyhomes.com/

Address: 1687 Timocuan Way #101, Longwood, FL

  • A New Beginning Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: 1687 Timocuan Way, Suite 101Longwood, FL

tiny house construction site

10. Georgia

Georgia is known for its vibrancy and is one of the fastest-growing areas in the country today. Just a few miles drive from the city of Atlanta, and you will find a simpler life in the rural South. Furthermore, there are plenty of RV parks and campgrounds where you can park your unit. 

  • Mustard Seed Tiny Homes

Website: https://mustardseedtinyhomes.com/ 

Address: Brogdon Road, Suwanee, GA

  • Free Range Tiny Homes

Website: https://mustardseedtinyhomes.com/

Address: Suwanee, GA

  • Hummingbird Tiny Housing

Website: http://www.hummingbirdhousing.com/

Address: 3662 Old Macon Road, Danville, GA

  • Otter Hollow Design

Website: http://www.otterhollowdesign.com/ 

Address: Canton, GA

11. Hawaii

The island of Hawaii has a tropical climate. As such, tiny home builders try to maximize ventilation into their units by adding large windows. Most tiny homes here are usually built on a foundation. 

  • Habitats Hawaii

Website: https://www.habitatshawaii.com/

Address: 44-3201 Kula Kahiko Rd, HI

  • Tiny Pacific Houses

Website: https://www.tinypacifichouses.com/   

Address: Honolulu, HI

  • Island Tiny Homes

Website: http://islandtinyhomes.com/

Address: Maui, HI

12. Idaho

Another state known for camping and hiking, Idaho is great for outdoorsy people. It also snows in the state, which is why builders invest in insulation. Furthermore, they also use materials that can withstand heavy snow loads. 

  • Tiny Idahomes

Website:https://www.tinyidahomes.com/ 

Address: 1050 Cascade Road, Building No. 4, Emmett, ID

  • Tiny Portable Cedar Cabins

Website: https://www.tinyportablecedarcabins.com/

Address: Spirit Lake, ID

13. Illinois

The state of Illinois has a good balance of urban and rural life. The city of Chicago is known for its high-priced real estate. Tiny homes are a great choice for people who want an inexpensive housing option. 

  • Bantam Built

Website: https://bantambuilthomes.com/

Address: 1640 Shanahan Dr, South Elgin, IL

  • Switchgrass Tiny Homes

Website: https://switchgrasstinyhomes.com/ 

Address: Champaign, IL

14. Indiana

Indiana has a humid continental climate known for being windy all year round. The main challenge for builders here is to design units that can resist high levels of rain and wind. Furthermore, the state is known for its vast open plains and occasional storms. 

  • Unplugged Houses

Website: None 

Address: W County Road 900 S, Pendleton, IN

  • Carpenter Owl

Website: https://www.carpenterowl.com/ 

Address: 611 W 11th St, Bloomington, IN

15. Iowa

While Iowa has vast areas of open space, they haven’t been as friendly to the tiny house dwellers. There are still a lot of jurisdictions that impose strict zoning laws that prevent the construction of tiny homes. 

  • Tiny Vastu Cabin

Website: http://www.vastucabin.com/

Address: Fairfield, IA

16. Kansas

Kansas is an agricultural state with great extremes between winter and summer temperatures. There are hardly any tiny homes in this area.  

  • There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

17. Kentucky

Kentucky’s famous bluegrass plains are the perfect place to settle. There are also tons of things you can explore in the Appalachian mountains. Tiny home builders here have it easy as the place has a moderate climate all year round.

  • Amish Kentucky

Website: http://amishmadecabins.com/

Address: 772 Cedar Grove Rd, Shepherdsville, KY

  • WheelLife Tiny Homes

Website: https://wheellifehomes.com/

Address:  576 Deer Run Rd, Cold Spring, KY

18. Louisiana

Louisiana has a hot and humid climate. It also has a diverse landscape from coastal regions to swamps. As such, tiny home builders here specialize in keeping their units ventilated while keeping the water out. 

  • Tee Tiny Houses

Website: https://teetinyhouses.wordpress.com/our-models/ 

Address: 1056B Coteau Rodaire Hwy., Arnaudville LA

  • Preservation Tiny House Company

Website: http://www.preservationtinyhouse.com/ 

Address: 1900 St Claude Ave, New Orleans, LA

19. Maine

Maine is one of the northernmost parts of the US, and winters here can be quite daunting. On the flip side, Maine offers tons of outdoor activities such as boating, fishing, hiking, and camping during fall. Hence, most units here are built for those two polarizing seasons. 

  • Creative Cottages

Website: None

Address: Freeport, ME

  • Tiny Homes of Maine

Website: https://tinyhousesofmaine.com/

Address: 8 Morin St, Biddeford, ME 

20. Maryland

Maryland is known for its fascinating shores, which are loaded with fun activities such as kayaking and surfing. It also has a mild climate, which is perfect if you want to take a vacation. The state only has a few RV parks, which makes it difficult to park your mobile home.

  • Hobbitat Spaces

Website: http://hobbitatspaces.com/ 

Address: 428 Blue Sky Drive, Oakland, MD

  • Civic Works Tiny Homes

Website: http://civicworks.com/

Address: 2701 St Lo Dr, Baltimore, MD

  • Container Homes of Maryland and I CAN BUILD IT LLP

Website: https://www.icanbuilditllp.com/ 

Address: Hagerstown, MD

small home interior

21. Massachusetts

Massachusetts is known as the landing place of the Pilgrims and the Mayflower. The state is densely populated and can be very cold during the winter. Several townships also have restrictive zoning, which is a challenge that tiny home builders may help you with. 

  • B&B Precision Builders (B&B Micro Manufacturing)

Website: https://bbtinyhouses.com/

Address: 201 Howland Ave., Adams MA

22. Michigan

Renowned for its Great Lakes, Michigan is the place to be if you want watersports and other outdoor activities. However, because it borders Canada, you can expect cold winters. As such, builders of mobile homes here prioritize insulation, heating components, and snow load reinforcement when building a unit. 

  • Michigan Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.greatlakestinyhome.com/

Address: Mt. Pleasant, MI

23. Minnesota

Minnesota is known for producing dairy products, corn, wheat, and hogs. It also offers a gorgeous sight of the countryside just mere hours from its major cities. The winters here can be icy, which is what most tiny home builders have to solve when building a tiny house. 

  • Tiny Green Cabins

Website: http://tinygreencabins.com/ 

Address: 10661 Nassau St NE Ste 1100 Blaine, MN

  • Alpha Tiny Homes

Website: http://tinyhomesoffgridlife.homestead.com/ 

Address: 1328 Highway 96 E 55110 White Bear Lake, MN

24. Mississippi

The hot and humid state of Mississippi is the birthplace of the King of Rock and Roll– Elvis Presley. The weather here can also be rocking, especially during the summer. Most tiny homes here are designed to provide ventilation and keep its occupants cool. 

  • Tiny House Life

Website: http://www.tinyhouselifespace.com/

Address: 628 U.S. Highway 98 Hattiesburg, MS

25. Missouri

Missouri is regarded as the geographical center of the United States. It’s home to some of the rich national forests of the country which offers plenty of outdoor activities. They also have a decent tiny house presence and a few viable parking spots. 

  • Custom Container Living

Website: https://customcontainerliving.com/ 

Address: Archie, MO

  • Classic Building Sales

Website: https://www.classicbuildingsales.com/ 

Address: 67 Progress Lane Linn, MO

  • Mini Mansion Tiny Home Builders

Website: https://minimansionstinyhomebuilders.com/ 

Address:  Saint Peters, MO

26. Montana

Nicknamed the Treasure State, Montana is rich in minerals such as gold, copper, and silver. It’s also known for its vast open space, making it the perfect getaway for any outdoorsman. However, its low population also means there’s just a small presence of the tiny house movement here.   

  • A Room of One’s Own

Website: https://charlesfinn.wixsite.com/a-room-of-ones-own 

Address: Missoula, MT

  • ECO-BUILT

Website: http://www.ecobuilthomes.com/ 

Address: 2521 Old Hardin Road, Billings, MT

27. Nebraska

Nebraska has the potential to be a tiny home dwellers paradise. It has numerous open spaces, a few cities for modern-day living, and lots of inexpensive lands. However, zoning laws and the difficulty of obtaining permits for building a tiny house derail such prospects. 

TIny Midwest

Website: https://midwesttinyliving.com

Address: 3953 45th Ave SE, Saint Cloud, NE

28. Nevada

Two things Nevada is known for- its dessert and Las Vegas. One of the challenges of builders here is to keep their customers cool once they are in their tiny home unit. Luckily, there are numerous natural and artificial cooling methods that they can use to keep the tiny house temperature just right.

  • Old Hippie Design

Website: http://oldhippieww.com/

Address: 5117 Cereus Ct 89146 Las Vegas, NV

  • Tahoe Tiny House and Trailers

Website: https://www.tahoetinyhousesandtrailers.com/ 

Address: South Lake Tahoe, NV

  • Sierra Tiny Homes Reno

Website: https://www.sierratinyhouses.com/

Address: Reno, NV

29. New Hampshire

Another outdoor recreational center, New Hampshire is the place to be for skiing, snowboarding, hiking, and camping. While there is only one known tiny home builder in the state, they are known for producing some of the best models out there. 

  • Tiny House Northeast

Website: https://tinyhousenortheast.com/ 

Address: Wakefield, NH

30. New Jersey 

New Jersey is one of the most populated states in the country, thanks to its large and mid-sized cities. There are also a few recreations here, such as the Pine Barrens. Currently, there’s only one tiny home builder in this region. 

Big B’s Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.bigbtinyhomes.com/

Address: Southern New Jersey

tiny house on the mountains

31. New Mexico

Snowbirds often flock this state during the winter months. Its milder climate is quite alluring, especially for people who are escaping the cold. Builders here utilize every method to catch every cooling breeze while keeping their units well insulated. 

  • Southwest Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: 520 Central Ave #B Williamsburg, NM

  • Piney Pods

Website: https://www.pineypods.com/ 

Address: 137 Deer Park Drive – Alto, NM 

32. New York

As the famous song said, New York is a “concrete jungle where dreams are made of.” But aside from the Empire State building, the state is also known for its rural and semi-rural areas. Builders here design their tiny home models to withstand the cold temperatures brought by the occasional snow. 

  • Tiny Hamptons Homes

Website: https://tinyhamptonshomes.com/

Address: 210 David Whites Ln unit a, Southampton, NY 

  • Bear Creek Carpentry

Website: https://bearcreektinyhouses.com/

Address: Woodgate, NY

  • Hudson River Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.hudsonrivertinyhomes.com/ 

Address: 3429 U.S. 9, Valatie, NY

33. North Carolina

There are plenty of outdoor stuff to explore in North Carolina from its lowlands to its mountainous regions. While the state generally has a mild climate, higher places are known for their snow. As such, tiny home builders here design their units to withstand winter while also keeping them cool during the summer. 

  • Brevard Tiny House Company

Website: https://brevardtinyhouse.com/

Address: Asheville, NC

  • Perch & Nest

Website: https://www.perchandnest.com/

Address: Winston-Salem, NC

  • Migration Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: Richfield, NC

Wishbone Tiny Homes

Website: http://www.wishbonetinyhomes.com/

Address:  Asheville, NC

34. North Dakota

There is one word that can best describe North Dakota– it’s wild. The state is host to a long stretch of national forests and public land for recreation. Most of its rural areas also have very limited restrictions, plus the fact that land is cheap makes it a tiny house haven.  

  • Tilt Cabins

Website: None

Address: Minot, ND

35. Ohio

Ohio has a vivacious tiny house presence. While the state is known for snowfall and cold winters, tiny home builders here are well prepared and keep this fact when designing their mobile home models.

  • Modern Tiny Living

Website: https://www.moderntinyliving.com/ 

Address: Columbus, OH

  • Skosh Tiny Living

Website: None

Address: Rittman, Ohio

  • Small Spaces CLE

Website: https://www.smallspacescle.com/

Address: 4565 Willow Parkway Cuyahoga HTS, OH

36. Oklahoma 

Oklahoma is not quite as mountainous as most states where there are plenty of outdoor activities. It’s mostly plains and a few low mountains and rolling hills here and there. With that said, there is almost no sign of tiny house presence in this state. 

  • There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

37. Oregon

The progressive and bustling state of Oregon is a tiny home friendly territory. With tons of outdoor activities, excellent housing sector, and a robust job market, it’s one of the centers of the tiny home movement. Tiny house builders flock  the state, and there are plenty of designs to choose from. 

  • Tiny Heirloom

Website: https://www.tinyheirloom.com/

Address: 9002 N Sever Ct. Portland, OR 

  • Handcrafted Movement

Website: https://handcraftedmovement.com/

Address: Portland, Oregon

  • Tiny Mountain Homes

Website:  https://www.tinymountainhouses.com/

Address: Salem, OR

  • Tiny SMART House

Website:https://www.tinysmarthouse.com/

Address: 34025 Texas St SW, Albany, OR

  • Oregon Cottage Company

Website: https://oregoncottagecompany.net/

Address: 831 Snell St, Eugene, OR

  • Shelter Wise 

Website: https://www.shelterwise.com/mobile-home/

Address: 18179 Portland, OR

38. Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is known for a lot of things from its major cities, its forests, and of course– chocolate factories. However, it’s densely populated and has plenty of building requirements, plus it has very strict zoning laws. Still, there are a few tiny home builders here that can take on the job of producing your dream tiny house. 

  • 84 Lumber Tiny Living

Website: https://www.84lumber.com/

Address: Eighty Four, PA

  • Liberation Tiny House

Website: https://www.liberationtinyhomes.com/

Address: 101 Ashmore Drive, Leola, PA

  • The Unknown Craftsmen

Website: None

Address: Unityville, PA

39. Rhode Island

The tiniest state in the country has a low population. With an area of just 1,214 miles, there’s hardly any tiny home presence here. 

  • There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

40. South Carolina

South Carolina’s landscape is quite diverse. It also has plenty of activities to offer, such as hiking and beach activities. The climate here can be humid and hot, especially during the summer. 

  • Driftwood Homes USA

Website: None

Address: 49 Pennington Dr Ste F, Bluffton, SC 

  • Green River Log Cabins

Website: https://greenriverlogcabins.com/

Address: 770 W. Frontage Rd Campobello, SC

tiny house contractors

41. South Dakota 

South Dakota is known for its cheap tracts of land and vast empty spaces. It also has some of the most popular national parks such as Mt. Rushmore and the Badlands. However, given its low population, there is hardly any tiny home presence in this region. 

There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

42. Tennessee

The state of Tennessee has some of the best snowboard and ski resorts in the country. It also has a rugged yet breathtaking mountain landscapes such as the Blue Ridge Mountains. Its chilly winters and humid summers require tiny home builders to be versatile in their craft. 

  • New Frontier Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.newfrontiertinyhomes.com/

Address: Nashville, TN

  • Incredible Tiny Homes

Website: http://www.incredibletinyhomes.com/ 

Address: 850 Industrial Road, Newport, TN

  • Wind River Tiny Home

Website: https://www.windrivertinyhomes.com/

Address: Chattanooga, TN

  • Heartland Tiny Homes

Website: https://www.heartlandtinyhomes.com/ 

Address: 1100 The Trace Rd, Dover, TN 

43. Texas

The largest state of continental US has a strong tiny house presence. Thanks to its vibrant modern cities and vast areas of rural land, it’s one of the best places to settle your tiny home on wheels. Many of the small home builders here are known to export their tiny house models to other parts of the country. 

  • Tiny Life Construction

Website: http://www.tinylifeconstruction.com/

Address:  3500 Apache Forest Drive, Austin, TX

  • Nomad Tiny Homes

Website: http://www.nomadtinyhomes.com/

Address: Dripping Springs, TX

  • TexZen Tiny Home Company

Website: http://texzentinyhomes.com/

Address: 11800 Manchaca Rd, Austin, TX

  • American Tiny House

Website: https://www.americantinyhouse.com/

Address: 5805 East US Highway 80, Longview, TX

  • Kanga Rooms

Website: http://kangaroomsystems.com/

Address: 3501 Jack Kultgen Expressway76711 Waco, TX

44. Utah

When you think of Utah, you immediately associate it with outdoor activities. From snowboarding to skiing, this state is the place to be when you’re an outdoor lover. No wonder there is a strong presence of the tiny house movement here. 

  • Alpine Tiny Homes

Website: None

Address: 462 E 1750 N; Vineyard, UT

  • Maximus Extreme Living Solutions

Website: None

Address: 1193 West Wilson Lane, West Haven, UT

45. Vermont

While the tiny house movement hasn’t really boomed in Vermont, it’s slowly gaining traction. With tons of outdoor activities to offer, especially in the Green Mountains, it has the potential to be a tiny house hub. A couple of builders also think so and have set up shop in the state.  

  • Jamaica Cottage Shop

Website: https://jamaicacottageshop.com/

Address: 170 Winhall Station Rd, South Londonderry, VT 

  • Tiny House Crafters

Website: None

Address: Sherwood Forest 05148 Londonderry, VT

46. Virginia

Jamestown in Virginia is known as the first English settlement in the country. Known as the “birthplace of America,” Virginia has one of the most famous national parks in the US– Shenandoah. Besides that here are also a couple of tiny house companies in the country that can help you build your micro-housing needs. 

  • Tiny House Building Company

Website: https://www.tinyhousebuildingcompany.com/

Address: 11001 Houser Drive Suite 16 Fredericksburg, VA

  • Build Tiny

Website: https://build-tiny.com/ 

Address:  Clarke County, VA

47. Washington

Washington has a fair treatment for the tiny house movement. Indeed, it’s population of outdoor-loving people is also into sustainable living. Additionally, it also has one of the major employment capitals in the US– Seattle city. 

  • Zyl Vardos

Website: http://www.zylvardos.com/

Address: Olympia, WA

  • Cascade Tiny Homes

Website: http://www.cascadetinyhouses.com/

Address:  6400 Woodlyn Rd 98248 Ferndale, WA

  • Greenpod Development

Website: http://www.greenpoddevelopment.com/

Address:606 Roosevelt St, Port Townsend, WA

  • Minim Homes

Website: https://minimhomes.com/ 

Address: Washington, D.C. 

48. West Virginia

West Virginia’s rugged terrain and low population density make it quite hard for the tiny house movement to establish its roots. 

There is no known tiny home builder in this state. 

49. Wisconsin

Dubbed as America’s dairyland, Wisconsin is a well-known producer of cheese. Besides that, its rural landscapes are also quite a sight to behold. It also has cold winters and warm summers, which most tiny house builders in the area try to address.

  • ESCAPE

Website: https://www.escapetraveler.net/

Address: Rice Lake, WI

  • Utopian Villas

Website:  http://www.utopian-villas.com/

Address: 3123 S. Memorial Dr. Mt. Pleasant, WI 

  • MODS International

Website: https://www.mods.us/

Address: 5523 Integrity Way Appleton, WI 

50. Wyoming

If you ever consider alternative sustainable living, then Wyoming is one of the best places to be. With just a population of above half a million over a hundred thousand square miles, you can find privacy here. Furthermore, the parcels of land are quite affordable, making it a great retirement retreat.  

  • Wheelhaus

Website: https://wheelhaus.com/

Address: Jackson, WY 

  • Teton Buildings

Website: http://tetonbuildings.com/

Address: 2701 Magnet St, Houston, TX 

mobile home builders

Hiring a Tiny Home Builder vs. Doing It Yourself (DIY)

Learning how to build a home, even on a smaller scale, has a steep learning curve. This is doubly true if you don’t have any background in carpentry, plumbing, electrical wiring, and other building skills. 

Commissioning a Tiny Home Builder

As such, many individuals who want to own a tiny home usually hire the services of a builder. Most builders even have a team of professionals such as architects, structural engineers, and contractors who can produce the tiny house of your dream.

Additionally, you won’t need to worry about how to get the materials for the project as the company also has its construction supplies. All you have to do is help out on the design phase and let the rest of their team do the heavy work.

Depending on the size of your tiny home, its materials, and the amenities inside it– your builder may ask you anywhere between $10,000 and $150,000. To prevent going over your budget, you can tell your builder how much you are willing to spend for the tiny house. They will then present you with a design concept that fits your preference and the amount you are ready to pay.  

When looking for a tiny home builder and the tiny home you want them to build, here are some things to consider:

  • Quote or estimate of the project and what’s included
  • Materials that they will use such as fiberglass for insulation
  • Size and gross weight of the tiny house unit
  • Space-saving features and overall functionality
  • The estimated time it would take to complete your tiny home
tiny house builders

Most commissioned tiny home projects to have a timeframe of 3 to 6 months before they are finished and ready for furnishing. Some tiny home companies even deliver completed tiny homes right at your doorstep or front yard. 

Pros

  • Takes a shorter time to build your tiny home
  • Won’t take too much of your precious time
  • Better quality as professionals make them
  • The design complies with RVIA standards 

Cons

  • Generally more expensive than DIY
  • Finding the right builder within your state

DIY Project

On the other hand, you can also build your own tiny houses provided that you have the tools and knowledge to do so. A lot of the early owners of tiny homes made their units during their spare time. 

Moreover, some tiny home companies also sell blueprints and teach people how to construct their own micro houses. You can even go to seminars held by these building companies so you can learn the basics of building a house.

Consequently, constructing your tiny home unit takes time, especially if it’s on the broadside. Several factors can determine the time it would take to finish this DIY project:

  • Size and design of the tiny home
  • Type of materials that you will be using
  • Amount of time you can allocate for the project
  • Number of people working
  • Level of expertise of the workers
tiny house construction in progress

If you stumble upon a problem that is beyond your knowledge, its advisable that you consult an expert. Structural engineers, carpenters, and even your local contractor can point you in the right direction of your tiny home building efforts.   

Pros

  • Generally much cheaper than letting a builder assemble one for you
  • You can freely choose the design and materials to use
  • Highly customizable up to the smallest detail
  • Very rewarding once you finished building the tiny unit

Cons

  • Takes 3-4 times longer to build compared to a builder’s unit
  • Requires the owner to learn a lot of things about construction

Conclusion

The majority of the states in the United States have at least one tiny home builder in it. Furthermore, you can visit them in their workshop and see the tiny home models in their showroom. Hence, making it easier for you to design or choose on the tiny home of your dreams. 

Related Questions

How much will it cost you to build your own tiny home?

According to a tiny house community survey in 2015, the average cost of building your own tiny house is around $23,000. However, you can still build a tiny house at a lower budget depending on its design, size, materials, and additional labor.

My state doesn’t have a tiny home builder; why?

There are a lot of factors why a tiny home builder has yet to set up shop in a state. It could be that the zoning laws in the state don’t make it attractive for people to own a tiny home. 


8 Tiny House Safety Procedures: An Important Guide

8 Tiny House Safety Procedures: An Important Guide

tiny house safety procedures

Did you know? According to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), more accidents happen at home than anywhere else. It also added that there are about 6,000 deaths per year as the result of a home accident. 

The statistics added that falls are the most common accidents. RoSPA encourages everyone to take preventative actions to reduce accidents at home.

Accidents can still happen even in tiny houses. And for the most part, wheeled tiny houses are more exposed to accidents, especially whenever they zip the road. 

However, by taking tiny house safety procedures, you can reduce or even prevent accidents from happening. 

There’s a lot you can do to avert you and your family from home injuries. This blog post enlists the safety methods you can perform from building your tiny home to residing in it.

Are Tiny Houses Really Safe to Live In?

Petite homes offer shelter, comfort, and protection the same as large, traditional houses do, albeit the limited space. 

Tiny houses are safe to live in, as long as you practice safety procedures religiously. Preventative measures should also be exercised when constructing your home and traveling from one place to another. 

1. When Building Your Tiny House

tiny house construction safety

When building your tiny house, the chance is that there will be no officials to look over your shoulder to ensure that you’re following the necessary requirements in constructing a house. But this doesn’t mean that you must cut corners. 

Safety starts at the beginning of your project. When constructing your tiny home, you must use safety gear and ensure that everything you do is according to the code requirements. 

This may sound like a hassle, but you won’t regret doing so. Don’t underestimate the potential dangers. 

If it’s possible, take extensive training before constructing your home. 

Do not use unsteady scaffolding, loose boards, and unsecured ladders. If you need to reach something, use a safety ladder, not a chair or table. 

You must also stay dry, especially if you need to access zones where electricity is being installed. 

And when you need to lift something, make sure you do it the right way!

Most importantly, be watchful! By being aware of all that is happening on your building site, you escalate your safety.  

If you hire a professional crew to build your home and notice that they violate basic safety procedures or code requirements, you must report them immediately to the foreman. 

2. Reducing Risk Inside and Around Your Tiny House

Home accidents don’t just happen out of the blue. They happen because we fail to notice the things that lead us to them. 

For example, not cleaning up cooking oil spills can cause the floor to become slippery, which can then lead to an injury. The injury could’ve been avoided if only you took immediate preventative actions. 

The safety tips mentioned below will help you reduce the risks inside and around your tiny house.

Kitchen

Cooking is fun, but your safety in the kitchen is a top priority. Some of the most dangerous items can be found in the kitchen, including knives, electrical appliances, and even bacteria.

So what can you do to reduce accidents in the kitchen area?

  • Do not put flammable objects near fire sources. Papers, plastics, and curtains, for example, must be put away from the stovetop, oven, or portable heater. 
  • There must be space around appliances for proper ventilation. Otherwise, the devices may overheat and cause a fire. 
  • Store sharp objects like knives and other similar tools and utensils in a drawer or a wooden block. 
  • Make sure all electrical cords are not tangled to other appliances or are not draped across the stovetop. 
  • When cooking, make sure to tie your hair back. Avoid wearing loose clothing when cooking, as well. You don’t want your hair or clothing to catch fire accidentally. 
  • Keep potholders nearby and use them, but do not leave them near an open flame. 
  • Clean up spills immediately to avoid slips and falls from happening. 
  • Make sure there’s a fire extinguisher handy in the kitchen. 
  • Always wash your hands before and after handling foods or meat. 
  • Toxic and poisonous chemicals must be stored properly. Don’t place bleach or other similar chemicals in the kitchen. 

 Bedroom

  • Do not smoke in your bedroom. Your linen can easily catch fire, and you want to distance them from any source of fire or heat. 
  • Use mattresses with flame-resistant protection. 
  • If you’re sleeping in a lofted bed, make sure the loft is sturdy and can manage your weight. 
  • Your phone and flashlight should be reached easily in case of emergencies. You are also very vulnerable when you sleep, so ensure you have a weapon within reach, pepper spray, for example. 

Bathroom

  • All electrical appliances must have a safe distance from water. 
  • Adding non-slip floor mats or strips can help prevent slips and falls. 
  • Keep your bathroom clean and dry as much as possible. 
  • If you’re using a DIY composting toilet, make sure to manage your waste properly. 

Roof Deck

A functional tiny house roof deck is perfect for enjoying cold nights, but this zone can still put you at risk. 

Falls are one of the most common home accidents, and it can happen on roof decks. So make sure to perform safety procedures in your roof deck to prevent accidents from happening. 

  • Upon building your roof deck, use durable materials that can withstand harsh weather and wear and tear. 
  • Know how much loading capacity your roof deck can manage. 
  • Protect yourself, your kids, and your guests from falling from the deck by installing robust railings on your roof deck. 
  • The access to the roof deck must be easy and safe for both young and old. 

In the yard

Owners of tiny houses on permanent foundation enjoy the perks of having a yard they can garden in or walk their pets to. 

But accidents can still happen in the yard. Hence, you must take safety precautions in it. 

  • Install a sturdy fence surrounding your property. 
  • When working in the yard in bad weather, wear the right footwear that will prevent you from falling or slipping. 

Stairs

  • The steps must be dry and clean. 
  • Remove objects in the steps that can hurt; Lego bricks, for example. 
  • The stairs must be sturdy and well lit.

3. Living in a Tiny House with Children

tiny house children safety

Safety procedures must be exercised if there are kids in your tiny house. 

Kids love to explore their homes, but they really don’t give that much care about the potential dangers. As an adult, there are things you can do to keep the children safe from accidents. 

Choking

Suffocation and strangulation are two of the common accidents that happen to children. To prevent these from happening, you must:

  • Keep stuffed toys and piles of clothing out of cots;
  • Wrap blind cords in cleats installed to the wall
  • Inspect your kid’s toys. Avoid giving them toys that they might swallow.

Cuts

  • Don’t let your kids play with sharp objects. Knives and other similar tools and utensils must also be kept away from them. 
  • Ensure that your children play toys without sharp edges that may cut them. 

Poisoning

Prevent kids from eating or drinking harmful substances by following these safety procedures:

  • All medicines must be stored away from the children. Items that seem harmless can be extremely dangerous if consumed in large quantities by kids. And remember, just because your cabinet is placed up high doesn’t mean your children can’t get their hands on what is in them. 
  • Laundry and cleaning supplies must be out of sight and out of reach of children. 
  • Do not put cleaning materials in containers that were once used for food. This may lead the kids to get curious about what’s in the container is still ingestible. 
  • Bad food preparation can also cause food poisoning. Keep the kitchen clean and practice proper hygiene when preparing meals. 

Burns

Many household items can cause burns to kids. Here are some tips to avoid childhood burns:

  • Keep children away from hot beverages and spills. Do not cook, carry, or drink hot beverages or foods while carrying or holding a kid. Keep warm foods and drinks away from the table or counter edges. 
  • Don’t let the kids get near a fire source. If possible, do not let them come near your stove, space heater, or radiator. 
  • Keep hot devices out of sight and reach. Items like iron, water heater, and curling irons must be stored away. 
  • Cover unused electrical outlets with safety caps. 
  • Keep wires and electrical cord out of the way. 
  • Hide lighters and matches. And always warn your kids not to play with fire. 

4. Living in a Tiny House with Elders

Making your tiny house safety-proof is crucial, particularly if you live with older adults. 

You must have a list of emergency numbers by each phone. If you’re moving to places from time to time, make sure to get the emergency hotlines of your locality. You should also know the location of the nearest hospital in case of an emergency. 

  • If possible, let the elderly sleep in a lower bed instead of a lofted bed. It’s easier for them to access, and it reduces the risk of falling. 
  • Make sure to tape all rugs to the floor, so they don’t move when you walk on them. 
  • Always keep their medications within reach. 
  • Clear clutter and electric cords. 
  • Keep your tiny house — inside and outside — well lit.

5. Guard Your Tiny Home Against Fire

We need fire for cooking. While the fire is beneficial, it is also dangerous. Fires are a big concern in any house — big or small. However, because tiny houses have limited space, a small fire can quickly turn destructive.

It’s not unusual to make cooking mistakes when cooking. But you need to remember that these mistakes can lead to small-scale fires, and then to a disastrous fire. 

So, you must take precautions so you can keep your tiny home safe. 

The best way to prevent a fire is to make a plan. 

The good news is that there are now hundreds of tools you can use to help you detect potential causes of fire. 

Fire Detectors

Fire detectors come in different kinds. A fire detector identifies phenomena that may lead to a fire. 

tiny house fire alarm
Fire alarms can help you detect early signs of fire

Smoke Detector

Some states require that your home must have at least one smoke detector. 

A smoke detector alerts you if there is smoke present inside your house. The number of smoke detectors you must have depends on the size and number of levels of your tiny house. 

Modern smoke detectors can now notify you via your phone, so you’ll know if there is smoke in your tiny house even if you’re far away.

Propane Gas Detector

Propane has a lot of use in a tiny house. You can use it for cooking and heating. Though helpful, it can also be dangerous. 

Propane leaking may result in a destructive fire. 

Smoke detectors only sense smoke, but not propane gas. Also, your nose can’t always smell a gas leak, no matter how good it is. 

Fire Extinguisher

If there is a fire already, you need something to put the fire out before it gets worst. 

Having a fire extinguisher is common sense, but you’d be surprised to know that not everyone has it. Most people overlook the importance of having a fire extinguisher, which, obviously, is wrong. 

No law requires you to have one at home, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have one. 

The number of fire extinguishers you need depends on the size of your tiny home. If, for example, you have a two-story tiny house, then one for each level is advised. 

Exit Access

Detecting fire before it becomes destructive is important. And urgently putting off a small-scale fire is also vital. But when the fire becomes rather harmful, you must get out of the house immediately through your exit access. 

If you can extinguish the fire, do so thoroughly. But if not, you need to run to safety and call for help.

There should be no household items or clutter that block your way to your exit, so in case of a fire, you can easily escape.

Loft Window

Fires can happen anytime. And you’re most vulnerable when you’re asleep. So in case of fire during the night time, you must be able to escape from your tiny house through your loft window. 

6. Keep The First Aid Kit Handy

First aid kits are a must so you can quickly treat ailments and injuries that happen at home. A first aid kit can help reduce the severity of the wound or ailment. It can also reduce the risk of infection. 

7. Get Directions

You must know where the nearest hospital, fire department, and police station are, so you can quickly go to them in case of emergencies, and you can’t reach them out through your phone. 

If you’re constantly moving to places, you must get information about the place you want to go before traveling. 

8. Guard Your Tiny Home Against Intruders

Tiny house safety is not just about reducing risk and protecting your house from fire. It also involves protecting your household from intruders. 

  • Do not open the door to strangers. You must also teach this to your kids and even to your aging parents. 
  • Before heading to bed, make sure the windows and doors are locked. 
  • Keep your phone and lights within reach. 
  • You can install an intruder alarm that beeps when a culprit tries to enter your home. Some home alarms can notify you through your phone if someone tries to break into your house.

Related Questions

Why is home safety important?

By keeping your home safe from dangers and equipped with home safety products, you can prevent accidents such as falls. You can also prevent emergencies like fires. 

What are the most common home accidents?

The most common home accidents are falls, cuts, burns and fire, poisoning, and drowning.