A Guide to Traveling with a Tiny Home

A Guide to Traveling with a Tiny Home

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Traveling with a Tiny Home
Traveling with a Tiny Home

Have you ever thought of how it is to travel with a tiny home? The experience of traveling with a tiny home is like going to different places without leaving your house.

Yes, exploring different places on wheels is easily doable with a tiny home. When you live in a tiny house, you can easily go anywhere you want – from different campgrounds to where your loved ones or friends live. You can start having an adventure as you begin to travel to different places anytime without a fuss. Thanks to tiny homes.

If you want to travel in a tiny house and you want to make the most out of it, you must not only keep these guidelines in mind but also follow them. Let this guide to traveling with a tiny home take you to good places yet still make you feel comfortable at home.

Ready, Set, Travel!

Living in a tiny home is fun and can be full of adventure provided that before you start traveling with your tiny home, you plan and follow this simple guide to make your travel more enjoyable and worthwhile:

  • Add bubble levels to your tiny home’s wheels.

A bubble level is a tool that tells whether a surface is vertical or horizontal. It is useful for helping you make sure that your tiny home is level.

Before going on a travel adventure with your tiny home, make sure that you have bubble levels on the back center of my tiny house for both right and left leveling. You also need to have one on the side for both back and front leveling.

When you have bubble levels, you can elevate one side of your tiny home a few inches higher. In addition, when bubble levels are attached to your tiny home, cabinets and doors will close properly so that they won’t swing open.

More importantly, sleeping and falling off the loft will not be something to worry about anymore. When you have bubble levels, you will have a stabilized tiny home.

  • Contact your campground before your arrival.

To avoid possible hassles, you must call your the park where you will be staying ahead of time and tell them, for example, that you will park a 20-feet tiny home.

In addition, you have to inform them about the things that you’ll need – electricity, drain for gray water, as well as water.

Calling certain campgrounds in advance will save you the hassle of being turned down and looking for another campground right then and there.

When you call your chosen campground before you arrive and you are informed that they won’t be able to accommodate you or provide one of your needs, you can just look for another without wasting time and energy.

  • Ensure that loose items won’t fall over.

Before hitting the road, you must secure all the items inside your tiny home and make sure that loose items inside your tiny home won’t fall over.

You can do this by adding a cord to secure books on your bookshelf (to prevent them from sliding and falling) as well as adding fish hooks or locks to your drawers.

More importantly, secure items in your tiny home, which are fragile, such as plates, glasses, mugs, and the like. Doing this will not only prevent your personal belongings from being broken but will also let you enjoy mess-free travel.

  • Use an RV GPS.
Driving with RV GPS
Driving with RV GPS

When you and your loved ones travel with your tiny home, relying on Google Maps for road directions and other driving information is not enough.

As a better alternative, go get yourself an RV GPS, which will provide you with details, such as gasoline stations, alternative routes, road and speed warnings, live traffic updates, graphic images of roads, weather forecasts, as well as other specific stops.

  • Weigh your tiny home.

It is important that you know the weight of your tiny home. In addition, you need to have a tow vehicle that is always ready and capable of handling the load of your tiny home.

One of the most important things that you have to deal with before traveling with your tiny home is the weight distribution system.

Here are more important reasons to know and maintain the weight of your tiny home:

  1. To make sure that the concrete, grass, or gravel where your tiny house rests on can support its weight.
  2. To know if your tow vehicle can drag the weight of your tiny home.
  3. To ensure that the weight distribution is right.

Pros of Traveling with a Tiny Home

  • All the things that you need are there with you.

When you travel in your tiny house, all the things that you need to stay comfortable are handy – this means convenience while traveling.

In addition, traveling with your tiny home is hygienic. Yes, you read that right. Unlike staying in a hotel, tiny home traveling lets you use your towels, sheets, blankets, as well as your kitchen utensils (spoon and fork, most importantly).

Because of that, you won’t have to share those items with somebody you don’t even know, and you will have more peace of mind.

  • You can travel safely because of your tiny home’s durability.

The materials used in constructing your tiny home are the same as those which are used in building real houses. That makes your tiny home as durable. So when you travel in your tiny house, your safety and security won’t be compromised.

Cons of Traveling with a Tiny Home

  • You have to spend more on fuel.

When you live and travel with your tiny home, you have to refuel all the time. We all know the price of fuel these days. You have to be ready to spend more on fuel because traveling with your tiny home will burn a hole in your pocket.

  • Not all roads are passable to tiny houses.

Traveling with your tiny home comes with a few restrictions. Since you are driving something that is big and heavy, there may be possible route restrictions.

Tiny houses must travel on wide roads. In addition, they should be able to pass the vertical clearance, so make sure to plan your route ahead.

Always Bring these Helpful Tools:

Driving Tools
Driving Tools
  1. Hydraulic jack
  2. Coupler lock
  3. Jack stabilizers
  4. Spare tire/s
  5. Wheel levers
  6. Wrench

Tiny-Home Driving Tips:

  • Always have driving tools with you.
  • Drive slowly, but surely. Do not over speed.
  • Inspect your side mirrors frequently.
  • Plan your route, and know which roads are passable to tiny houses.
  • Take wide turns.
  • Turning right or left? Do it slowly.

Related questions:

  • Can tiny houses get evicted from campgrounds or parks?
Notice of Eviction
Notice of Eviction

Yes. When someone from the neighborhood where your tiny home is parked complains about you, you will be given an eviction notice.

  • How big can a tiny house be?

The size of a tiny home can range between 100 to 400 square feet. That is why when you travel in a tiny home, you have to plan your route ahead and make sure that the roads you will pass are wide enough for your tiny home.

  • Do tiny houses get inspected?

Yes. Like regular houses, a tiny home also has to pass inspection for safety as well as power and water supply availability. To learn more about this, check this article about tiny house inspection.

All About Tiny Houses is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

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